sweer

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English swer, sware, from Old English swǣr, swār ‎(heavy, of great weight, oppressive, grievous, painful, unpleasant, great, sad, feeling or expressing grief, grave, slow, dull, sluggish, slothful, indolent, inactive from weakness, enfeebled, weak), from Proto-Germanic *swēraz, *swērijaz ‎(heavy), from Proto-Indo-European *swēr- ‎(heavy). Cognate with West Frisian swier ‎(heavy, burdensome, onerous, pregnant), Dutch zwaar ‎(heavy, hard, difficult), German schwer ‎(difficult, hard, heavy), Swedish svår ‎(hard, severe, difficult, heavy), Latin sērius ‎(earnest, serious), Lithuanian swarus ‎(heavy), Albanian var ‎(to hang, burden, annoy), Ancient Greek ἕρμα ‎(hérma, prop, foundation, reef, hill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sweer ‎(comparative more sweer, superlative most sweer)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Heavy.
  2. (Britain dialectal) Dull; indolent; lazy.
  3. (Britain dialectal) Reluctant; unwilling; disinclined.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zweren, from Middle Dutch sweren, from Old Dutch *swerien, sweren, from Proto-Germanic *swarjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *swer-.

Verb[edit]

sweer ‎(present sweer, present participle swerende, past participle gesweer)

  1. to swear

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English swǣr. Cognate with West Frisian swier, Dutch zwaar, German schwer, Swedish svår.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sweer (comparative mair sweer, superlative maist sweer)

  1. reluctant, unwilling
  2. sad, depressed
  3. lazy
  4. depressing

Related terms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

  • 2000, The flouer's bonniness minded him o cantier times but the rose itsel wis mingin wi sweir connotations. But n Ben A-Go-Go p.6