thig

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English thiggen, from Old English þicgan ‎(to take, receive, accept; ingest; eat or drink, consume, partake of), from Proto-Germanic *þigjaną ‎(to accept, receive, beg), from Proto-Indo-European *tek-, *teḱ- ‎(to receive). Cognate with Middle High German digen ‎(to beg, implore, beseech), Swedish tigga ‎(to beg, mooch), Icelandic þiggja ‎(to get, receive, accept), Welsh teg ‎(fair, beautiful, cute).

Verb[edit]

thig ‎(third-person singular simple present thigs, present participle thigging, simple past and past participle thigged)

  1. (transitive) To beseech; supplicate; implore.
  2. (transitive) To solicit, usually by begging; ask as alms; beg.
  3. (intransitive) To make supplication.
  4. (intransitive) To profit by or live on the gifts of others.
  5. (intransitive) To take alms.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, Scotland) To crave; seek (a favour).

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

thig

  1. (Cois Fharraige) Alternative form of thuig

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thig

  1. Lenited form of tig.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish ·ticc, prototonic form of do·icc ‎(comes).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [hiɡ̊ʲ], /hikʲ/

Verb[edit]

thig ‎(past thàinig, future thig, verbal noun tighinn, past participle tigte)

  1. to come
    Thiginn a steach a rithist ged a chuirteadh a mach mi.
    I would come in again though I were put out.

Conjugation[edit]

Participles
Tense \ Voice Active Passive
Present a' tighinn --
Past thàinig --
Future thig --
Conditional thigeadh --

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]