wic

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See also: WIC and wić

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-West Germanic *wīk, borrowed from Latin vīcus (village), from Proto-Indo-European *weyḱ- (village, household). Cognate with Old Saxon wīk and Old High German wīh, both masculine. Replaced earlier Proto-Germanic *wīhsą (village, settlement) of the same Proto-Indo-European root.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wīċ n

  1. village
  2. temporary abode: camp, encampment, lodging
  3. bay

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: wic, wike, wych

Old High German[edit]

Noun[edit]

wic ?

  1. battle

Polish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Witz, derived from Middle High German witz, derived from Old High German wizzi, derived from Proto-West Germanic *witi, derived from Proto-Germanic *witją, derived from Proto-Indo-European *weyd-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wic m inan

  1. (colloquial) joke (story with a funny punchline, told to make the audience laugh)
    Synonyms: greps, kawał

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • wic in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • wic in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Silesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Witz.

Noun[edit]

wic m

  1. joke