drug: difference between revisions

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(Noun: sense 4: +psychoactive before substance; +"and addictive"; +"such as cocaine";)
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# {{rfv-sense}} {{pharmacology}} A substance, sometimes [[addictive]], which affects the [[central nervous system]].
 
# {{rfv-sense}} {{pharmacology}} A substance, sometimes [[addictive]], which affects the [[central nervous system]].
 
# A chemical or substance, not necessarily for [[medical]] purposes, which alters the way the [[mind]] or body works.
 
# A chemical or substance, not necessarily for [[medical]] purposes, which alters the way the [[mind]] or body works.
# A substance, especially one which is [[illegal]], [[ingest]]ed for [[recreational]] use.
+
# A [[psychoactive]] [[substance]], especially one which is [[illegal]] and [[addictive]], [[ingest]]ed for [[recreational]] use, such as [[cocaine]].
 
#* '''1971''', [[w:Hunter S. Thompson|Hunter S. Thompson]], ''Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'', Harper Perennial 2005 edition, p. 3,
 
#* '''1971''', [[w:Hunter S. Thompson|Hunter S. Thompson]], ''Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'', Harper Perennial 2005 edition, p. 3,
 
#*: We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the '''drugs''' began to take hold.
 
#*: We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the '''drugs''' began to take hold.

Revision as of 11:47, 4 May 2013

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English drogge (medicine), from Middle French drogue (cure, pharmaceutical product), from Old French drogue, drocque (tincture, pharmaceutical product), from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German droge, as in droge vate (dry vats, dry barrels), mistaking droge for the contents, which were wontedly dried herbs, plants or wares. Droge comes from Middle Dutch drōghe (dry), from Old Saxon drōgi (dry), from Proto-Germanic *draugijaz (dry). Cognate with English dry, Dutch droog (dry), German trocken (dry).

Noun

drug (plural drugs)

  1. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) Template:pharmacology A substance used to treat an illness, relieve a symptom, or modify a chemical process in the body for a specific purpose.
    Aspirin is a drug that reduces pain, acts against inflammation and lowers body temperature.
    The revenues from both brand-name drugs and generic drugs have increased.
  2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Template:pharmacology A substance, sometimes addictive, which affects the central nervous system.
  3. A chemical or substance, not necessarily for medical purposes, which alters the way the mind or body works.
  4. A psychoactive substance, especially one which is illegal and addictive, ingested for recreational use, such as cocaine.
    • 1971, Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Harper Perennial 2005 edition, p. 3,
      We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold.
    • March 1991, unknown student, "Antihero opinion", SPIN, page 70
      You have a twelve-year-old kid being told from the time he's like five years old that all drugs are bad, they're going to screw you up, don't try them. Just say no. Then they try pot.
    • 2005, Thomas Brent Andrews, The Pot Plan: Louie B. Stumblin and the War on Drugs, Chronic Discontent Books, ISBN 0976705605, page 19
      The only thing working against the poor Drug Abuse Resistance Officer is high-school students. ... He'd offer his simple lesson: Drugs are bad, people who use drugs are bad, and abstinence is the only answer.
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Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

drug (third-person singular simple present drugs, present participle drugging, simple past and past participle drugged)

  1. Template:transitive To administer intoxicating drugs to, generally without the recipient's knowledge or consent.
    She suddenly felt strange, and only then realized she'd been drugged.
  2. Template:transitive To add intoxicating drugs to with the intention of drugging someone.
    She suddenly felt strange. She realized her drink must have been drugged.
  3. Template:intransitive To prescribe or administer drugs or medicines.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2

Germanic ablaut formation, cognate with Dutch droeg, German trug, Swedish drog, Old English drōg.

Verb

drug

  1. (Southern US) simple past tense and past participle of drag
    You look like someone drug you behind a horse for half a mile.
Usage notes
  • Random House says that drug is "nonstandard" as the past tense of drag. Merriam-Webster once ruled that drug in this construction was "illiterate" but have since upgraded it to "dialect". The lexicographers of New World, American Heritage, and Oxford make no mention of this word.

References


Romanian

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian drug.

Noun

drug m (plural drugi)

  1. pole, stick

Noun

drug n (plural druguri)

  1. This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *drugъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrowgʰos.

Pronunciation

Noun

drȗg m (Cyrillic spelling дру̑г)

  1. friend
  2. comrade

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Synonyms


Slovene

Adjective

drug (??? please provide the comparative!)

  1. other, another, different

Declension