chum

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

1675–85; of uncertain origin, possibly from cham, shortening of chambermate, or from comrade.

Noun[edit]

chum (plural chums)

  1. A friend; a pal.
    I ran into an old chum from school the other day.
  2. (dated) A roommate, especially in a college or university.
    • 1856 in The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine [1]
      Field had a 'chum,' or room-mate, whose visage was suggestive to the 'Sophs;' it invited experiment; it held out opportunity for their peculiar deviltry.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

chum (third-person singular simple present chums, present participle chumming, simple past and past participle chummed)

  1. To share rooms with; to live together.
    • 1899 Clyde Bowman Furst, A Group of Old Authors [2]
      Henry Wotton and John Donne began to be friends when, as boys, they chummed together at Oxford, where Donne had gone at the age of twelve years.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      A chap named Eleazir Kendrick and I had chummed in together the summer afore and built a fish-weir and shanty at Setuckit Point, down Orham way. For a spell we done pretty well.
  2. To make friends with; to socialize.
    • 1902 Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness [3]
      "I was not surprised to see somebody sitting aft, on the deck, with his legs dangling over the mud. You see I rather chummed with the few mechanics there were in that station, whom the other pilgrims naturally despised -- on account of their imperfect manners, I suppose. This was the foreman -- a boiler-maker by trade -- a good worker...
    • 1902 Ernest William Hornung, The Amateur Cracksman [4]
      "You'll make yourself disliked on board!"
      "By von Heumann merely."
      "But is that wise when he's the man we've got to diddle?"
      "The wisest thing I ever did. To have chummed up with him would have been fatal -- the common dodge."
  3. (Scotland, informal) To accompany.
    I'll chum you down to the shops.

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps from Powhatan.

Noun[edit]

chum (uncountable)

  1. (fishing) A mixture of (frequently rancid) fish parts and blood, dumped into the water to attract predator fish, such as sharks.

Verb[edit]

chum (third-person singular simple present chums, present participle chumming, simple past and past participle chummed)

  1. (fishing) To cast chum into the water to attract fish.
    • 1996 Frank Sargeant, The Reef Fishing Book: A Complete Anglers Guide [5]
      Small live baitfish are effective, and they will take bits of fresh cut fish when chummed strongly.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chum m (plural chums)

  1. (Canada, informal) A boyfriend (Feminine form: blonde).
    Elle m'a présenté son nouveau chum.
    She introduced me to her new boyfriend.
    Je croyais qu'il était rien qu'un ami à Éric mais en fait c'est son chum.
    I believed that he wasn't just another of Éric's friends, but in fact his boyfriend.
  2. (Canada, chiefly slang) A friend, usually male; a chum (Feminine form: chum de fille).
    J'suis allé danser avec un gang de mes chums.
    I went to dance with a group of my male friends.

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inflected form of cum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [xuːmˠ], [xʊmˠ]

Verb[edit]

chum

  1. past indicative analytic of cum

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish dochum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

chum

  1. Obsolete spelling of chun.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Preposition[edit]

chum

  1. Alternative form of chun.

Verb[edit]

chum

  1. past tense of cum