deus

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See also: déus and Deus

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

deus

  1. plural form of deu

Verb[edit]

deus

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of deure

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin deus.

Noun[edit]

deus m (plural deuses)

  1. god, deity

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From earlier *dẹ̄vos, from Old Latin deiuos, from Proto-Italic *deiwos, from Proto-Indo-European *deywós. An o-stem derivative from *dyew- (sky, heaven), from which also diēs and Iuppiter. Cognate with Welsh duw, Lithuanian dievas, Persian دیو (div, demon).

The late Old Latin form *dẹ̄vos regularly lost its -v- before a rounded vowel, but it was retained before other vowels, giving rise to case forms both with and without -v-. The presence of -v- in turn prevented the intermediate vowel -ẹ̄- from being raised to -ī-, which led to an alternation between *dē- before back-vowel endings and *dīv- before front-vowel endings. The former gave rise to the nominative deus, while the latter became a separate word, dīvus. Finally, -v- was lost between identical vowels, giving the diī(s) forms, or contracted dī(s).[1] Only the vocative retained the -v-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

deus m (genitive deī); second declension (nom. plural deī or )

  1. god, deity
    • 63 BCE, Cicero, Catiline Orations (Latin text and English translations here)
      O di immortales, ubinam gentium sumus? Quam rem publicam habemus? In qua urbe vivimus?.
      O ye immortal gods, where on earth are we? In what city are we living? What is the government we have?
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Daniel 1:2
      [] et asportavit ea in terram Sennaar in domum dei sui et vasa intulit in domum thesauri dei sui
      " [] which he carried into the land of Shinar to the house of his god; and he brought the vessels into the treasure house of his god."
    In principio erat Verbum et Verbum erat apud Deum et Deus erat Verbum.
    In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and God was the Word.
  2. an imperial epithet (for deified emperors)
  3. vocative singular of deus

Inflection[edit]

Second declension, several irregular plural forms.

Number Singular Plural
nominative deus
diī
deī
genitive deī deōrum
deûm
dative deō dīs
diīs
deīs
accusative deum deōs
ablative deō dīs
diīs
deīs
vocative deus
dive

diī
deī

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

  • dea (goddess)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Numeral[edit]

deus

  1. two

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin deus (god). See deus for more information.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

deus

  1. (Christianity) God

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese deus (God), from Latin deus (god, deity), unusual in that it was derived from the nominative instead of the accusative (deum), from Old Latin deiuos (god, deity), from Proto-Italic *deiwos (god, deity), from Proto-Indo-European *deywós (god, deity), from *dyew- (sky, heaven).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

deus m (plural deuses, feminine deusa, feminine plural deusas, feminine deia (poetic), feminine plural deias)

  1. god; deity

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French deus (compare French deux), from Latin duōs, masculine accusative of duo.

Numeral[edit]

deus

  1. two