dies

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dies

  1. third-person singular simple present indicative form of die

Noun[edit]

dies

  1. plural form of die (when used in the sense of a pattern)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

dies

  1. plural form of dia

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dies

  1. Alternative form of dieses

Usage notes[edit]

In the nominative and accusative neuter, the forms dieses and dies are per se interchangeable. However, there is a tendency to use dieses in some contexts, and dies in others:

  • In adjectival usage dieses is generally preferred over dies. Thus: dieses Haus ("this house") is more frequent than the also correct and synonymic dies Haus.
  • In substantival usage, dieses is used referring to a specific neuter noun given earlier in the text:
Unser Unternehmen sollte das Gebäude verkaufen. Wir können dieses nicht mehr gebrauchen.
Our company should sell the building. We cannot make use of it anymore.
  • Dies is used referring to a preceding context or phrase:
Unser Unternehmen sollte das Gebäude verkaufen. Dies würde uns viel Geld einbringen.
Our company should sell the building. This would earn us a lot of money.
Dies is also used to refer to something perceived sensuously by the speaker (deixis):
Sieh dir dies mal an! – Have a look at this! (e.g. a newspaper article)
  • The above rules are followed mainly in formal speech and writing. Colloquially, the shorter dies is often used where otherwise dieses would be preferred.

External links[edit]

  • dies in Duden online

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formed from the accusative diem, at a time when the vowel was still long. From Proto-Italic *djēm, the accusative of *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dyew- (heaven, sky; to shine). The Italic stem was also the source of Iovis, the genitive of Iuppiter, and was generally interchangeable with it in earlier times (still shown by the analogical formation Diēspiter). The original nominative survives as *diūs in two fossilised phrases: mē diūs fidius (an interjection) and nū diūs tertius (day before yesterday, literally now (is) the third day).

Cognate with Old Armenian տիւ (tiw, daytime), Old Irish día, Welsh dydd. English day is a false cognate (see there).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diēs m, f (genitive diēī); fifth declension

  1. day (any period of twenty-four hours)
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus.16.26
      sex diebus colligite in die autem septimo sabbatum est Domino idcirco non invenietur
      Six days ye shall gather it; but on the seventh day, which is the sabbath, in it there shall be none.
  2. day (part of a day period between sunrise and sunset where one enjoys daylight)
  3. (often in the feminine) a set day or appointed time; date, appointment

Inflection[edit]

Diēs is an exceptional case of a fifth declension noun since it is both used in the masculine form and in the feminine form, instead of just feminine like the rest of the fifth declension nouns. The masculine use is more common, and almost invariable in the plural. The feminine use is found in the singular when the day is being personified as a goddess, when it refers to a specific day (e.g., the date of a letter, or an appointed day for business), when it refers to the passing of time, and occasionally in other contexts.

Fifth declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative diēs diēs
genitive diēī diērum
dative diēī diēbus
accusative diem diēs
ablative diē diēbus
vocative diēs diēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dorsum. Compare French dos.

Noun[edit]

dies m

  1. (anatomy) back

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dьnьsь

Adverb[edit]

dies

  1. (Kajkavian) today