echt

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German echt (real). The German term originates from Middle Low German echt (lawful, genuine), contraction of ehacht, variant form of ehaft (lawful, pertaining to the law) from ê(e) (law, marriage).

Adjective[edit]

echt (comparative more echt, superlative most echt)

  1. proper, real, genuine, true to type
    • 2009 January 18, Ross Douthat, “When Buckley Met Reagan”:
      An echt Burkean with a snob’s disdain for the contemporary Republican Party, Hart hinted at a road not taken [] .

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch echt, from Old Dutch *ēhaft. Cognate to German echt.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

echt (comparative echter, superlative echtst)

  1. authentic, genuine, real

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

echt

  1. really

Noun[edit]

echt n (uncountable)

  1. reality, real life
    We konden hem in het echt ontmoeten.
    We could meet him in reality.

Synonyms[edit]

echt m (uncountable)

  1. marriage

In de echt verbinden, to bind in matrimony

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle Low German echt (lawful, genuine), contraction of ehacht, variant form of ehaft (lawful, pertaining to the law) from ê(e) (law, marriage). Related to German Ehe (marriage) and displaced Old High German ēhaft (honourable).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

echt (comparative echter, superlative am echtesten)

  1. authentic, genuine, real

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

External links[edit]

  • echt in Duden online