heil

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Heil

English[edit]

Verb[edit]

heil (third-person singular simple present heils, present participle heiling, simple past and past participle heiled)

  1. To greet with a Sieg Heil.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

heil n (uncountable)

  1. prosperity
  2. salvation

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • heile (chiefly colloquial; rarely in writing)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German, from Old High German heil, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole). Compare Low German heel, heil, Dutch heel, English whole, hale, Danish hel. The sense “whole, entire”, which is the normal one in most cognate forms, is dialectal in German (but compare heilfroh).

Adjective[edit]

heil (comparative heiler, superlative am heilsten)

  1. whole; intact; unhurt; safe
    Die Tasse ist noch heil. — “The cup is still whole.”
    Gut dass du heil wieder zurück bist. — “I’m glad you’re back safe.”
  2. (in combination with certain nouns) sheltered; innocent; ideal
    heile Kindheitinnocent childhood
    heile Weltideal world

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • heil in Duden online

Icelandic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

heil (masculine heill, feminine heil, neuter heilt)

  1. (indefinite) feminine singular nominative of heill
  2. (indefinite) neuter plural nominative of heill
  3. (indefinite) neuter plural accusative of heill

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse heill, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

heil (masculine and feminine heil, neuter heilt, definite singular and plural heile, comparative heilare, indefinite superlative heilast, definite superlative heilaste)

  1. whole, not in pieces
  2. healthy; uninjured

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hailaz, whence also Old Saxon hēl, Old English hāl, Old Norse heill, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌻𐍃 (hails), Vandalic eils. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole).

Adjective[edit]

heil

  1. whole
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hailą, whence also Old English hæl, Old Norse heill.

Noun[edit]

heil n

  1. luck

Old Norse[edit]

Adjective[edit]

heil

  1. feminine singular indefinite nominative of heill (‘whole’)
  2. neuter plural indefinite nominative or accusative of heill (‘whole’)