herra

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See also: Herra

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

herra

  1. hatred

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder). Cognates include Danish, Norwegian and Swedish herre, Icelandic herra, Dutch heer, German Herr. The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

herra

  1. mister, gentleman, sir (polite address)
    Anteeksi, herra ...
    Excuse me, sir ...
    Hyvät herrat!
    Gentlemen!
    Herra Virtanen, voinko puhua kanssanne?
    Mister Virtanen, may I speak with you?
  2. lord (person having formal authority over others)
  3. lord (person enjoying great respect in a community)
  4. lord, master (owner)
  5. capitalized (Herra), Lord (God)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Compounds[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder). Cognates include Danish, Norwegian and Swedish herre, Dutch heer, German Herr. The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

herra m (genitive singular herra, nominative plural herrar)

  1. lord, master
  2. the Lord (God)
  3. mister, gentleman
  4. sir

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Used as a title (prenominally or on its own) for bishops and for the president of Iceland (also, especially historically, for some other dignitaries). Also used as a general courtesy title for men, equivalent to English mister, but then usually only in formal written correspondence and abbreviated Hr. However, when it is used as an honorary title for bishops, presidents, etc., it should never be abbreviated. The equivalent female title is frú (in both contexts).

See also[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

herra (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative herraði, supine herrað)

  1. to address or refer to as herra (as should be done to bishops, etc.)

Conjugation[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder).[1] The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Noun[edit]

herra m

  1. mister, gentleman
  2. sir

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.