luster

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See also: Luster

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French lustre, from Old Italian lustro, from Latin lustrare (to brighten), akin to lux (light)

Noun[edit]

luster (plural lusters)

  1. (US) Alternative spelling of lustre.; shine, polish or sparkle.
    He polished the brass doorknob to a high luster.
    • Addison
      The scorching sun was mounted high, / In all its lustre, to the noonday sky.
  2. By extension, brilliance, attractiveness or splendor.
    After so many years in the same field, the job had lost its luster.
    • Sir H. Wotton
      His ancestors continued about four hundred years, rather without obscurity than with any great lustre.
  3. Refinement, polish or quality.
    He spoke with all the lustre a seasoned enthusiast should have.
  4. A candlestick, chandelier, girandole, etc. generally of an ornamental character.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Alexander Pope to this entry?)
  5. A substance that imparts lustre to a surface, such as plumbago or a glaze.
  6. A fabric of wool and cotton with a lustrous surface, used for women's dresses.
Antonyms[edit]
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Translations[edit]
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Verb[edit]

luster (third-person singular simple present lusters, present participle lustering, simple past and past participle lustered)

  1. (intransitive) To gleam, have luster
  2. (transitive) To give luster, distinguish
  3. (transitive) To give a coating or other treatment to impart physical luster
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin lustrum, from lustrare, cognate with the above

Noun[edit]

luster (plural lusters)

  1. A lustrum, quinquennium, a period of five years, originally the interval between Roman censuses
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, II.4.2.ii:
      Mesue and some other Arabians began to reject and reprehend it; upon whose authority, for many following lusters, it was much debased and quite out of request [...].
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Anagrams[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

lust +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

luster (plural lusters)

  1. One who lusts.
    • Bible, Paul
      Neither fornicators, nor those who serve idols, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor the lusters after mankind [] shall obtain the kingdom of God.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French lustre, see luister.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lus‧ter

Noun[edit]

luster m (plural lusters, diminutive lustertje n)

  1. A chandelier, an ostentatious ceiling light
  2. Alternative form of luister.

Polish[edit]

Noun[edit]

luster

  1. genitive plural of lustro

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Luster.

Noun[edit]

lùster m (Cyrillic spelling лу̀стер)

  1. chandelier

Declension[edit]