lust

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Old English lust (lust, pleasure, longing), from Proto-Germanic *lustuz. Akin to Old Saxon, Dutch lust, Old Frisian, Old High German, German Lust, & Swedish lust, Danish lyst & Icelandic lyst, Old Norse losti, Gothic lustus, and perhaps to Sanskrit lush "to desire" and Albanian lushë (bitch, savage dog, promiscuous woman), or to English loose. Confer list (to please), listless.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust (countable and uncountable, plural lusts)

  1. A feeling of strong desire, especially of a sexual nature.
    Seeing Kim fills me with a passionate lust.
  2. (archaic) A general want or longing, not necessarily sexual.
    The boarders hide their lust to go home.
    • Spenser
      For little lust had she to talk of aught.
    • Bishop Hall
      My lust to devotion is little.
  3. (archaic) A delightful cause of joy, pleasure.
    An ideal son is his father's lasting lust.
  4. (obsolete) virility; vigour; active power
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

lust (third-person singular simple present lusts, present participle lusting, simple past and past participle lusted)

  1. (intransitive) To desire very strongly.
    She was lusting after the new short dress she set her eyes on in the shop.
  2. (intransitive) To crave sexual contact urgently.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch, from Old Dutch *lust, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz. Compare West Frisian lust, German Lust, English lust.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust c (plural lusten, diminutive lustje n)

  1. lust, desire (especially sexual)
  2. pleasure, joy
    Het was een lust om naar hem te kijken en te luisteren.
    It was a pleasure watching and listening to him.
  3. benefit, advantage

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lust

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of lusten
  2. imperative of lusten

Old English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust m

  1. desire, pleasure, appetite, lust
    Him wæs metes micel lust: he had a craving for food. (Ælfric's Homilies)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust c

  1. (uncountable) lust (a mood of desire), joy, a keen interest
    jag har ingen lust att läsa idag
    I don't feel like reading today
  2. a desire (for something specific)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]