sæl

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Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse selr (seal).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɛːl/, [sɛːˀl]

Noun[edit]

sæl c (singular definite sælen, plural indefinite sæler)

  1. seal (Phocidae)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sæl

  1. hi, hello (to a female or a mixed male/female group)

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proto-Germanic *salą, from Indo-European. Cognate with Old High German sal, German Saal (hall, large room), Old Saxon sal, Dutch zaal. Compare sele, from a Germanic variant stem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sæl n (nominative plural salu)

  1. room, great hall, (large) house, castle
    Wuna salu sinchroden. — By custom, ornately decorated halls.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: sale

Etymology 2[edit]

Proto-Germanic *sēliz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sǣl ?

  1. happiness, prosperity
  2. (proper) occasion, time; season, opportunity, condition, position
    Ðás wyrte man mæg niman on ǽlcne sǽl. — This plant may be gathered at any time.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • sǣlan, sēlan — to take place, happen; to tie, bind, fetter, fasten: curb, restrain, confine
  • sǣlig — happy, prosperous
  • sǣlige — happily
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]
  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", sæl et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), sæl.