saeta

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English[edit]

Noun[edit]

saeta (plural saetas)

  1. A Spanish religious song evoking strong emotion, usually sung during public processions.

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

(index sa)

Etymology[edit]

From the adjective sakea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

saeta

  1. (intransitive, usually of snowfall) To thicken, become/get thick(er).
    Lumisade sakeni nopeasti ja näkyvyys huononi.
    The snowfall thickened fast and the visibility worsened.

Conjugation[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *saitā, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ito-, *sh₂éyto-, from *sh₂ey-, *seh₂i- (to bind). Compare Old High German seid (cord), Old Norse seior, Czech sit (net), Old Church Slavonic сеть (setĭ, trap, snare), Lithuanian sietas (tie), Old Prussian saytan (belt, strap), Avestan [script needed] (haetu, dam), and Sanskrit सेतु (sétu, bridge, fetter, band).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saeta f (genitive saetae); first declension

  1. a bristle, (rough) hair on an animal

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative saeta saetae
genitive saetae saetārum
dative saetae saetīs
accusative saetam saetās
ablative saetā saetīs
vocative saeta saetae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ saeta” in Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, pages 533, 534

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sagitta (arrow).

Noun[edit]

saeta f (plural saetas)

  1. arrow, crossbow bolt

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sagitta.

Noun[edit]

saeta f (plural saetas)

  1. arrow
  2. dart

Related terms[edit]