-ter

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Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps ultimately from the nominative masculine singular of oppositional adjectives in Proto-Indo-European *-teros; perhaps extended from the suffix in prepositions like inter, praeter.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ter (comparative -tius, superlative -tissimē)

  1. -ly; used to form adverbs from adjectives.

Usage notes[edit]

The suffix -ter is usually added to a third-declension adjective or participle stem to form an adverb of manner.

Examples:
prudenter (intelligently, wisely), from prudēns (knowing, experienced)
dissimulanter (dissemblingly, secretly), from dissimulāns, present active participle of dissimulō (dissemble, conceal)

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]



Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

/tɛr/ and /dɛr/ are variants of the same suffix. /tɛr/ (phonetically [tʰɛr]) is always spelt -ter whereas /dɛr/ is represented by -ter after an unvoiced fricative (phonetically [tɛr]) and by -der after other voiced sounds (phonetically [dɛr]).

Suffix[edit]

-ter m (plural -terau)

  1. forming abstract nouns, -ness, -ment
    craff (observant, astute) + ‎-ter → ‎craffter (astuteness)
    pell (far) + ‎-ter → ‎pellter (distance)
    gwag (empty) + ‎-ter → ‎gwacter (emptiness)

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “-ter”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies