celer

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Celer and céler

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

celer m

  1. celery

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin cēlāre, present active infinitive of cēlō (hide, conceal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

celer

  1. (transitive, literary) to conceal, hide
    Synonym: cacher
    • 1640, Pierre Corneille, “Act I, Scene I”, in Horace:
      Elle vous aime assez pour ne vous rien celer
      She likes you enough that she will conceal nothing from you

Conjugation[edit]

This verb is conjugated mostly like the regular -er verbs (parler and chanter and so on), but the -e- /ə/ of the second-to-last syllable becomes -è- /ɛ/ when the next vowel is a silent or schwa -e-. For example, in the third-person singular present indicative, we have il cèle rather than *il cele. Other verbs conjugated this way include lever and mener. Related but distinct conjugations include those of appeler and préférer.

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cellō, from Proto-Indo-European *kel-. Probably cognate with Ancient Greek κέλλω (kéllō).

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

celer (feminine celeris, neuter celere, comparative celerior, superlative celerrimus, adverb celeriter); third-declension three-termination adjective

  1. fast, swift, quick, speedy, fleet
    Synonyms: rapidus, vēlōx
    Antonym: lentus

Declension[edit]

Third-declension three-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative celer celeris celere celerēs celeria
Genitive celeris celerium
Dative celerī celeribus
Accusative celerem celere celerēs celeria
Ablative celerī celeribus
Vocative celer celeris celere celerēs celeria

Usage notes[edit]

According to Döderlein, celer and citus mean "swift, fast, quick" in terms of quick motion (in general) with tardus as their antonym. More specifically, citus refers to a lively motion, whereas celer refers to an eager or impetuous motion.

On the other hand, vēlōx and pernīx as "quick" denote a level of athletic nimbleness in terms of bodily activity, with lentus as their antonym. More specifically, pernīx involves a level of dexterity and quickness in an eclectic range of actions (such as climbing, hurdling, jumping, vaulting, etc.); whereas vēlōx is especially used for running, swimming and flying (moving in a direction)

Thirdly, properus and festīnus as "quick" refer specifically to one's speed in terms of the shortest time to reach a desitnation, with sēgnis as their antonym. More specifically, festīnus intimates a certain level of impatience, whereas properus simply indicates a haste from energy simply.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Portuguese: célere
  • Spanish: célere
  • Italian: celere
  • English: celerity

References[edit]

  • celer in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • celer in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • celer in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • celer in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • celer in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle French[edit]

Verb[edit]

celer

  1. to hide

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēlāre, present active infinitive of cēlō (hide, conceal).

Verb[edit]

celer

  1. to conceal

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-oils, *-oilt are modified to ouz, out. This verb has a stressed present stem çoil distinct from the unstressed stem cel. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /t͡sêler/
  • Hyphenation: ce‧ler

Noun[edit]

cȅler m (Cyrillic spelling це̏лер)

  1. celery

Declension[edit]