Joanne

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See also: JoAnne and Jo-Anne

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French Joanne, from Latin Joanna, from Koine Greek Ἰωάννα (Iōánna), from Hebrew יוֹחָנָה(Yôḥānāh, literally God is gracious), the feminized form of יְהוֹחָנָן(Yəhōḥānān) which produced John and its many doublets. Doublet of Ivana, Jana, Jane, Janice, Janis, Jean, Jeanne, Jen, Joan, Joanna, Johanna, Juana, Shavonne, Sian, Siobhan, Shane, Shaun, Shauna, and Sheena.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Joanne

  1. A female given name from French.
    • 1824 John Gibson Lockhart, The History of Matthew Wald, p. 192:
      "Ye've seen the Lady?"
      "I have," said I; "and I have seen the young ladies too, except Miss Joanne."
      "Ye may just as weel lay by the Miss, and ca' her Joan, like her mother afore her, noo—They've flung the puir lassie clean aff, Mr Waldie. Greeting for the father, and nae thought for the bairn—that's the warld's way, Mr Waldie.—But God strikes not wi' baith hands, young man...
    • 1981 Margaret Atwood, Bodily Harm, →ISBN, p. 24:
      Jocasta wasn't Jocasta's name: her real name was Joanne. She changed it when she was thirty-eight because, as she said what can you do with a name like Joanne? Too nice. She didn't dye her hair green or wear a safety pin in her ear but calling herself Jocasta was the equivalent. Good taste kills, said Jocasta.
Alternative forms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From various feminine names clipped to Jo + Anne, q.v.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Joanne

  1. A female given name.
Alternative forms[edit]