Roy

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See also: roy

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English, Scottish, and French name of Norman origin. Originating from the Normans, the descendants of Norse Vikings from Denmark, Norway and Iceland who later migrated to Normandy. The derivation is from the word roy, meaning "king".[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Roy

  1. A male given name.
    • 2003 Minette Walters: Disordered Minds. Macmillan. →ISBN page 173:
      - - - The real pity is that the only name William Burton remembers is Roy...it was a popular name in the fifties and sixties so there were probably quite a few of them."
      "Not that popular," said George. "Surely it's Roy Trent?"
      "Roy Rogers...Roy Orbison... Roy of the Rovers...Roy Castle..."
      "At least one of those was a comic-book character," said Andrew.
      "So? Bill Clinton and David Beckham named their children after places. All I'm saying is we can't assume Roy Trent from Roy."
  2. A city in Utah.

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Norman”, in Encyclopædia Britannica[1], accessed 6 February 2018
  2. ^ The Norman people and their existing descendants in the British dominions and the United States of America, Genealogical Pub Co, 1874, →ISBN, page 403 & 321 for the surname of "King" and "Roy".

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Roy

Proper noun[edit]

Roy

  1. (Canada) A male given name and A surname​. French families arrived in Canada during the 1700's and founded what would be known as Acadia. These included such places in the northeastern region of North America comprising what is now the Canadian Maritime Provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. [1]



Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Roy

Proper noun[edit]

Roy

  1. A male given name borrowed from English in the 19th century.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Roy

Proper noun[edit]

Roy c (genitive Roys)

  1. A male given name borrowed from English in the 19th century.
    1. ^ “Acadians”, in Wall of Names[2], accessed 6 February 2018