ael

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See also: áel, äl, and æl

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English aiel.

Noun[edit]

ael (plural aels)

  1. (law, common law, historical) grandfather; forefather, ancestor
    • 1864, “Reports of Cases in Trinity Term, 32 Edw. I.”, in Alfred J. Horwood, editor, Year Books of the Reign of King Edward the First. Years XXXII–XXXIII, London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, page 256:
      Richard de C. brought a writ of Ael against the Prior of Plumtone, and demanded so much &c. ; and counted that William his grandfather was seised &c. ; that from William it descended to William ; and from William to Richard the present demandant.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Noah Webster (1828) , “ayle”, in A Dictionary of the English Language[1], volume 1, New York, retrieved 2017-01-17
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Henry Campbell Black (1910) , “ÆL”, in Black's Law Dictionary[2], 2nd edition, West Publishing Company, archived from the original on 17 October 2015, retrieved 18 January 2017
  3. ^ “ail”, in The Law-french Dictionary Alphabetically Digested[3], 2nd edition, London, 1718, retrieved 2017-01-17

Anagrams[edit]


Crimean Gothic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Either from Turkic or from Proto-Germanic *halluz.

Noun[edit]

ael

  1. stone
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Ael. Lapis.

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese ele.

Pronoun[edit]

ael

  1. he, she, third person singular.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *āl, from Proto-West Germanic *āl.

Noun[edit]

âel m

  1. eel

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: aal
  • Limburgish: aol

Further reading[edit]


Middle Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ael m

  1. Alternative spelling of áel

Mutation[edit]

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ael unchanged n-ael
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Welsh ail (eyebrow), related to Old Breton guorail (eyebrow) (probably from guor (over) + ail).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ael f (plural aeliau)

  1. eyebrow
    Roedd ganddo lygaid llawn, brown tywyll, gydag aeliau duon mawr.
    He had full dark brown eyes with big black eyebrows.
  2. edge, brow (of a hill)
    Trowch i’r chwith ar ael y bryn.
    Turn left on the brow of the hill.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ael unchanged unchanged hael
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “ael”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies