baff

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English baffen (to bark). Cognate with Dutch baffen (to bark), Low German baffen (to bark), German baffen, bäfzen (to bark), Danish bjæffe (to yelp), Swedish bjäbba (to yelp, bark). Compare buff, yaff.

Verb[edit]

baff (third-person singular simple present baffs, present participle baffing, simple past and past participle baffed)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To bark; yelp.

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Scots baff, beff, bauf, probably from West Flemish baf, baffe (a blow, slap in the face). Compare also Old French baffe (slap in the face) (Modern French baffe), of imitative origin.

Verb[edit]

baff (third-person singular simple present baffs, present participle baffing, simple past and past participle baffed)

  1. To hit or strike, especially with something flat or soft.
  2. (golf) To strike the ground with the bottom of the club when taking a stroke.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

baff (uncountable)

  1. (Tyneside) blank (Can we add an example for this sense?)

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /baf/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

baff (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial, chiefly predicative) flabbergasted
    • 2020 June 1, “Verliebt, verlobt – verschieben?”, in Die Zeit[1]:
      Sie haben gejubelt, hatten Ballons dabei und haben uns Glückwünsche zugerufen. Wir waren so baff. Manche kamen nur dafür von richtig weit her.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • baff in Duden online