baken

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See also: Baken

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English baken, from Old English bacen, ġebacen, past participle of bacan (to bake). Cognate with Scots baken (baked), Dutch gebakken (baked). More at bake.

Verb[edit]

baken

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England) alternative past participle of bake; baked.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Leviticus 2:7:
      And if thy oblation be a meate offering baken in the frying pan,it ſhalbe made of fine flowꝛe with oyle.
    • 1719, John Allen, “An ACT, Stating the due Aſſize of Bread”, in The Charter Granted by His Majeſty, King Charles the Second, to the Colony of Rhode-Iſland, and Providence-plantations in America[1], page 59:
      And be it further Enacted by the Authority aforeſaid, That in every Town in the Colony, where Bread is Baken for Sale, there ſhall be Choſen one Clerk of the Market, or more, as each Town ſhall find needful, at their Annual Election of Town Officers, who ſhall duly be Engaged, to the faithful performance of ſaid Office, as other Town Officers are ; []
    • 1819, George Gregory, A New and Complete Dictionary of Arts and Sciences: Including the Latest Improvement and Discovery and the Present States of Every Branch of Human Knowledge[2], volume 2, Collins and Company, page 112:
      As they grew soft and fluid, there oozed out 550 grains of a reddish watery liquid, which smelled like newly baken bread. To this liquid Dr. Pearson has given the name of laccic acid.

Usage notes[edit]

Though the use baken as a strong past participle for bake is now restricted to northern English dialects, it was formerly more widespread. For example, it is the predominant form in the King James Bible.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch baken, from Old Frisian bāken. Displaced Middle Dutch boken, from Old Dutch *bōkan. Both forms originate from Proto-Germanic *baukną.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaːkə(n)/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ken
  • Rhymes: -aːkən

Noun[edit]

baken n (plural bakens, diminutive bakentje n)

  1. beacon

Derived terms[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German bachan, bahhan; from Proto-Germanic *bakaną. Cognate with German backen, English bake, Dutch bakken.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaːken/, [ˈbaːkən]

Verb[edit]

baken (third-person singular present baakt, past participle gebak, auxiliary verb hunn)

  1. to bake

Conjugation[edit]

Regular
infinitive baken
participle gebak
auxiliary hunn
present
indicative
imperative
1st singular baken
2nd singular baaks bak
3rd singular baakt
1st plural baken
2nd plural baakt baakt
3rd plural baken
(n) or (nn) indicates the Eifeler Regel.

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English bacan, from Proto-Germanic *bakaną; cognate with Dutch bakken, German backen, Old Norse baka, Danish bage, and also Ancient Greek φώγω (phṓgō, to roast), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₃g-.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

baken

  1. To bake; to cook in an oven; usually used of bread, pastry, etc, or meals involving that.
    • c. 1200, Ormin, “Homily 8”, in Ormulum, lines 1566-1567:
      Þær þurrh þu bakesst Godess laf / & harrdnesst itt þurrh hæte...
      Through that you bake God's loaf / and harden it through heat.
      a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Leviticus 26:26”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      aftir that Y have broke the staf of youre breed, so that ten wymmen bake looues in oon ouene, and yelde tho looues at weiȝte; and ye schulen ete, and ye schulen not be fillid.
      After when I've snapped the staff of your bread, ten women will bake bread in one oven, and produce the bread apportioned by weight; you'll eat, but you won't be sated.
      a. 1394, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Parson's Tale”, in The Canterbury Tales[3], lines 383-384:
      He koude rooste, and sethe, and broille, and frye, / Maken mortreux, and wel bake a pye...
      He could roast, seethe, broil, fry, / make a pâté, and bake a pie well...
  2. To undergo or experienced baking; to be baked or cooked in an oven.
  3. To heat up; to process or work (food or other items) by heating or drying out.
  4. (rare, figuratively) To burn in the fires of Hell.
  5. (rare, figuratively) To cause one's own pain or torment.
Usage notes[edit]

This verb started to become weak in late Middle English, but was predominantly strong.

Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From baken, past participle of the verb baken (to bake).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

baken

  1. (rare) A meal made with pastry.
Descendants[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

baken m

  1. definite singular of bak

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

baken m or n

  1. definite masculine singular of bak

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

baken

  1. definite singular of bak
  2. definite plural of bak