basilisk

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See also: Basilisk

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English basilicke, borrowed from Old French basilique, from Latin basiliscus, from Ancient Greek βασιλίσκος (basilískos, literally, a minor king or chieftain; also, a kind of snake so called from a white spot on the head resembling a crown), from βασιλεύς (basileús, king).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæs.ɪ.lɪsk/, /ˈbæz.ɪ.lɪsk/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

basilisk (plural basilisks)

  1. A mythical snake-like dragon, so venomous that even its gaze was deadly.
    The deadly look of the basilisk
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      And without more ado she [...] fixed her wonderful eyes upon me - more deadly than any Basilisk's - and pierced me through and through with their beauty, and sent her light laugh ringing through the air like chimes of silver bells.
    1. (science fiction) An information hazard, especially a Langford's basilisk.
      • 2019 June 13, Tom Chivers, The AI Does Not Hate You[2], Orion Publishing Group, →ISBN:
        A basilisk, in this context, is information that can hurt you simply because you are aware of it.
  2. (heraldry) A type of dragon used in heraldry.
  3. A tree-dwelling type of lizard of the genus Basiliscus: the basilisk lizard.
    • 1965 (March), Boys' Life (page 52)
      As a guide to start your collection we'd suggest either iguanas, tejus, swifts, basilisks, horned toads or alligator lizards.
  4. A type of large brass cannon.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective[edit]

basilisk (not comparable)

  1. Suggesting a basilisk (snake-like dragon): baleful, spellbinding.
    • 1870, The British drama: illustrated, volume 4, page 997:
      Well, She is so basilisk ; there's no death in her eyes ...
    • 1884, M. L. O'Byrne, Ill-won Peerages, Or, An Unhallowed Union, page 126:
      her gaze became more basilisk in its expression, and her countenance bore some similitude to that of a handsome fiend
    • 2004, Witi Tame Ihimaera, Whanau II, page 167:
      He had never seen her quite like this, so basilisk, so frightening

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch basilisc, from Latin basiliscus, from Ancient Greek βασιλίσκος (basilískos)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌbaː.siˈlɪsk/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ba‧si‧lisk
  • Rhymes: -ɪsk

Noun[edit]

basilisk m (plural basilisken, diminutive basiliskje n)

  1. a basilisk (mythological or heraldic monster, part serpent, part rooster)
    Synonyms: koningshagedis, koningsslang
  2. (zoology) a basilisk, a tree-dwelling type of lizard of the genus Basiliscus
    Synonym: boomhagedis

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

basilisk

  1. Alternative form of basilicke