bouter

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French bouter, from Old French bouter (to strike, push), of Germanic origin, from Frankish *bōtan (to push, strike, beat), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to beat), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to beat, strike, hew). Cognate with Old High German bōzzan (to beat), Old English bēatan (to thrash, beat), Old Norse bauta (to beat). Compare also Spanish botar (to bounce), Italian buttare. More at beat.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bu.te/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

bouter

  1. (dated) to push
  2. (dated) to remove flesh from the skin of an animal
  3. (dated) to pin, to nail

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French bouter, of Germanic origin.

Verb[edit]

bouter

  1. (Jersey) to butt, collide

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Frankish [Term?] (to beat), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan.

Verb[edit]

bouter

  1. to strike; to hit
  2. to place; to put
  3. (reflexive, se bouter) to enter (into)

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

  • Anglo-Norman: boter, buter
  • Middle French: bouter
  • Norman: bouter (Jèrriais), boutaïr (Guernésiais)

References[edit]