brume

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See also: brumé and brumë

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French brume, from Latin brūma (winter solstice; winter; winter cold). Brūma is derived from brevima, brevissima (shortest), the superlative of brevis (brief; short) (the winter solstice being the shortest day of the year), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *mréǵʰus (brief, short).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɹuːm/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Noun[edit]

brume (countable and uncountable, plural brumes)

  1. (literary) Mist, fog, vapour.
    • 1737, François Rabelais, “Book V”, in Peter Anthony Motteux; Sir Thomas Urquhart, transl., The Works of Mr. Francois Rabelais [] [1], volume 2, Navarre Society, published 1921, page 438:
      For, shou'd you come before the Brume's abated / Th' Opime you'd linquish for the Macerated.
    • 1972, John Gardner, Grendel, André Deutsch, page 77:
      All around their bubble of stupidity I could feel the brume of the dragon.

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French brume, borrowed from Latin brūma (winter), possibly through the intermediate of Old Occitan bruma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brume f (plural brumes)

  1. mist, haze, fog

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: brume

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attested since the 18th century. Unknown: perhaps from Latin morbus, blended with Latin vomica.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brume m (plural brumes)

  1. pus
    Synonym: pus

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1983–1991), “gormar”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

brume f

  1. plural of bruma

Anagrams[edit]