bruma

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See also: brumă and brumã

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

bruma

  1. third-person singular past historic of brumer

Anagrams[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From brum (bud) +‎ -a.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bruma (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative brumaði, supine brumað)

  1. (intransitive, botany) to bud

Conjugation[edit]

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbru.ma/
  • Rhymes: -uma
  • Hyphenation: brù‧ma

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin brūma.

Noun[edit]

bruma f (plural brume)

  1. mist, haze
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek βρῶμα (brôma). Cf. Spanish broma.

Noun[edit]

bruma f (plural brume)

  1. shipworm

Further reading[edit]

  • bruma1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • bruma2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Doublet of brevissima (shortest), superlative form of brevis (short), without reformation of the superlative ending; parallel e.g. to extrēmus (see -issimus for more). The winter solstice is the shortest day of the year.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brūma f (genitive brūmae); first declension

  1. the winter solstice
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.163:
      Brūma novī prīma est veterisque novissima sōlis.
      The winter solstice is the first day of the new sun, and the last of the old
  2. (by extension) winter, winter cold

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative brūma brūmae
Genitive brūmae brūmārum
Dative brūmae brūmīs
Accusative brūmam brūmās
Ablative brūmā brūmīs
Vocative brūma brūmae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Eastern Romance:
    • Aromanian: brumã
    • Romanian: brumă
  • Old Occitan: bruma
  • Old Galician-Portuguese:
  • Old Spanish:
  • Albanian: brymë
  • Old French: brume
  • Vulgar Latin: brūmārius (November)

References[edit]

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 76
  • bruma”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bruma”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • bruma in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • bruma in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan bruma, from Latin bruma (winter solstice, winter). Cognate with French brume.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

bruma f (plural brumas)

  1. (Gascony, Languedoc, Limousin, Vivaro-alpine) fog

Derived terms[edit]

Dialectal variants[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

bruma

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese bruma, from Latin brūma.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: bru‧ma

Noun[edit]

bruma f (plural brumas)

  1. mist (water or other liquid finely suspended in air)
    Synonyms: cerração, nevoeiro, névoa, neblina

Related terms[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From brumă +‎ -a.

Verb[edit]

a bruma (third-person singular present brumează, past participle brumat) 1st conj.

  1. (impersonal) to have frost form
  2. to form frost, become covered in hoarfrost, rime

Conjugation[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin brūma.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɾuma/ [ˈbɾu.ma]
  • Rhymes: -uma
  • Syllabification: bru‧ma

Noun[edit]

bruma f (plural brumas)

  1. haze, especially costal fog or haar
  2. (archaic) winter
    Synonym: invierno

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]