cade

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Cade, cadé, cadê, -cade, cad é, and čadě

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /keɪd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English cade, kad, kod, ultimately of unknown origin.

Adjective[edit]

cade (not comparable)

  1. (of an animal) abandoned by its mother and reared by hand

Noun[edit]

cade (plural cades)

  1. An animal brought up or nourished by hand.
    • 1720, John Bulkeley, The Last-Day: Poem in XII Books, page 54:
      Then on the verdrous Bank, where Spices rose, Rowl on the balmy Grass, or smiling play With her young Cade, her caded Lamb with Smiles Answer'd her Love, and lickt her dainty hand.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French cade or Old Occitan cade, from Latin catanum.

Noun[edit]

cade (plural cades)

  1. Juniperus oxycedrus (western prickly juniper), whose wood yields a tar.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French cade (barrel), from Latin cadus (bottle, jar).

Noun[edit]

cade (plural cades)

  1. (archaic) A cask or barrel.
    A cade of herrings was a vessel containing 500 herrings, while a cade of sprats contained 1,000.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Used in the British Book of Rates for a determinate number of some sort of fish.

References[edit]

1728, Cyclopaedia, a publication in the public domain.

  • cade at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

cade

  1. present of cader
  2. imperative of cader

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

cade

  1. third-person singular present indicative of cadere

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

cade

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cadō

Noun[edit]

cade

  1. vocative singular of cadus

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic جادة(jāda).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cade f (Arabic spelling جادە‎)

  1. road, street

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]