cive

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English[edit]

Noun[edit]

cive (plural cives)

  1. Obsolete form of chive.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French cive, from Latin cēpa, caepa.

Noun[edit]

cive f (plural cives)

  1. chive

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cīvem, accusative of cīvis, from Proto-Italic *keiwis (society), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱéy-wo-s (intimate, friendly), derived from the root *ḱey- (to settle).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃi.ve/, [ˈt͡ʃiːve]
  • Rhymes: -ive
  • Hyphenation: cì‧ve

Noun[edit]

cive m (plural civi)

  1. (literary, obsolete) citizen
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio [The Divine Comedy: Purgatory] (paperback, in Italian), Bompiani, published 2001, Canto XXXII, lines 100–102, page 498:
      Qui sarai tu poco tempo silvano; ¶ e sarai meco senza fine cive ¶ di quella Roma onde Cristo è romano.
      Short while shalt thou be here a forester, and thou shalt be with me for evermore a citizen of that Rome where Christ is Roman.
    Synonym: cittadino

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

cīve

  1. ablative singular of cīvis

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

cive

  1. Alternative form of cyvee

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cēpa, caepa.

Noun[edit]

cive f (oblique plural cives, nominative singular cive, nominative plural cives)

  1. (often in the plural) chive

Descendants[edit]