cud

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See also: CUD, ćud, cüd, čud, and cuð

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English cudu, earlier cwidu, of Proto-Indo-European origin. Cognate with German Kitt and Sanskrit जतु (jatu, lac, gum).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cud (countable and uncountable, plural cuds)

  1. The portion of food which is brought back into the mouth by ruminating animals from their first stomach, to be chewed a second time.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cud (third-person singular simple present cuds, present participle cudding, simple past and past participle cudded)

  1. (transitive) To bring back into the mouth and chew a second time.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, "Singing," [1]
      Here were two ladies nearly fifty years old, throwing back their heads to sing love songs, nursery songs, hymns, God Save the Queen, Rule Britannia—songs that spilled over the drawing-room as easily as Small's cow songs spilled over the yard, only Small's songs were new, fresh grass snatched as the cow snatched pasture grass. The ladies’ songs were rechews—cudded fodder.
    • 1952, Doris Lessing, Martha Quest, HarperCollins, 2009, Part One, Chapter Two,
      [] although the wagon wheels perpetually flung up rivers of red sand, and she travelled in a column of whirling ruddy dust, the sweet perfumes of newly cudded grass mingled with it, mile after mile, as if the four-divided stomachs of the great oxen were filled with nothing but concentrated memories of hours of grazing along the water heavy vleis.

Etymology 2[edit]

Shorted form of could.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /kʊd/

Verb[edit]

cud

  1. (informal) Alternative form of could

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested from 16th c. From Old Polish czud, czudo < Proto-Slavic *čudo < Proto-Indo-European *(s)kēu̯d-es, *(s)kēu̯d-os. Cognates include Ancient Greek κῦδος (kûdos, glory).

Noun[edit]

cud m inan

  1. miracle

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]