diverge

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: divergé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin dīvergō (bend away from, go in a different direction), from Latin dī- + vergō (bend).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

diverge (third-person singular simple present diverges, present participle diverging, simple past and past participle diverged)

  1. (intransitive, literally, of lines or paths) To run apart; to separate; to tend into different directions.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively, of interests, opinions, or anything else) To become different; to run apart; to separate; to tend into different directions.
    • 2012, Christoper Zara, Tortured Artists: From Picasso and Monroe to Warhol and Winehouse, the Twisted Secrets of the World's Most Creative Minds, part 1, chapter 1, 28:
      The brooding, black-clad singer bridged a stark divide that emerged in the recording industry in the 1950s, as post-Elvis pop singers diverged into two camps and audiences aligned themselves with either the sideburned rebels of rock 'n' roll or the cowboy-hatted twangsters of country music.
    Both stories start out the same way, but they diverge halfway through.
  3. (intransitive, literally, of a line or path) To separate, to tend into a different direction (from another line or path).
    The sidewalk runs next to the street for a few miles, then diverges from it and turns north.
    • 2021 October 20, Paul Stephen, “Leisure and pleasure on the Far North Line”, in RAIL, number 942, page 49:
      North of Tain [...], the line reaches the southern shore of Dornoch Firth. Here, the railway and the A9 trunk road, which have hitherto run close together, diverge.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively, of an interest, opinion, or anything else) To become different, to separate (from another line or path).
    The software is pretty good, except for a few cases where its behavior diverges from user expectations.
  5. (intransitive, mathematics, of a sequence, series, or function) Not to converge: to have no limit, or no finite limit.
    The sequence diverges to infinity: that is, it increases without bound.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

diverge

  1. inflection of diverger:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /diˈvɛr.d͡ʒe/
  • Rhymes: -ɛrdʒe
  • Hyphenation: di‧vèr‧ge

Verb[edit]

diverge

  1. third-person singular present indicative of divergere

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dīverge

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of dīvergō

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French diverger, from Latin dīvergō.

Verb[edit]

a diverge (third-person singular present diverge, past participle divers3rd conj.

  1. to diverge

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

diverge

  1. inflection of divergir:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative