eid

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Eid, 'eid, and -eid

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Eid.

Noun[edit]

eid ‎(uncountable)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Eid

Etymology 2[edit]

From English dialectal eid, from Old Norse eið ‎(an isthmus, neck of land), from Proto-Germanic *aidiją ‎(isthmus, strait), of uncertain origin, but probably from Proto-Indo-European *h₁y- ‎(to go). Cognate with Icelandic eið, eiði, Faroese eið, eiði ‎(isthmus), Norwegian eid ‎(isthmus), Swedish ed. Compare Latin ‎(go, proceed, verb).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

eid ‎(plural eids)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) An isthmus or narrow neck of land jutting out into the sea; a sandbank cast up by the sea across the head of an open bight or inlet and having a lagoon inside it.

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse eið, from Proto-Germanic *aidą, probably related to Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey- ‎(go) and Latin eo. Cognate with Swedish ed, Icelandic eið, and Faroese eið.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eid n ‎(definite singular eidet, indefinite plural eid, definite plural eida or eidene)

  1. an isthmus

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

eid

  1. past participle of eie

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

eid m ‎(definite singular eiden, indefinite plural eidar, definite plural eidane)

  1. an oath

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse eið, from Proto-Germanic *aidiją, probably related to Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey- ‎(go) and Latin eo. Cognate with Swedish ed, Icelandic eið, and Faroese eið.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eid n ‎(definite singular eidet, indefinite plural eid, definite plural eida)

  1. an isthmus

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, whence also Old Saxon ēth, Old English āþ, Old Norse eiðr, Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌸𐍃 ‎(aiþs). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eid m

  1. oath

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: eit
    • German: Eid
    • Luxembourgish: Eed

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

eid m (plural eids)

  1. (Islam) Eid (Muslim religious festival)

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

eid

  1. (literary) impersonal imperfect / conditional of mynd

Synonyms[edit]