engel

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See also: Engel

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch engel.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

engel (plural engele)

  1. angel

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse engill (angel), borrowed from Old Saxon engil and/or Old English enġel, from Proto-West Germanic *angil, which is borrowed via Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos, messenger).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

engel c (singular definite englen or engelen, plural indefinite engle)

  1. angel

Inflection[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch engel, from Old Dutch engil, from Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

engel m (plural engelen, diminutive engeltje n)

  1. angel

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: engel
  • Negerhollands: engel
  • Papiamentu: engel

Anagrams[edit]

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch engil, from Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos).

Noun[edit]

engel m

  1. angel, servant of God
  2. fallen angel

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

engel

  1. Alternative form of aungel

Middle High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German engil.

Noun[edit]

engel m

  1. angel

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos), via Old Norse engill.

Noun[edit]

engel m (definite singular engelen, indefinite plural engler, definite plural englene)

  1. an angel

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos), via Old Norse engill.

Noun[edit]

engel m (definite singular engelen, indefinite plural englar, definite plural englane)

  1. an angel

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *angil, borrowed from Latin angelus, itself borrowed from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos, messenger).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈen.jel/, [ˈen.d͡ʒel]

Noun[edit]

enġel m (nominative plural englas)

  1. angel
    Slǣp þū swōte. Iċ hopiġe þæt þē mǣte be englum.
    Sleep well. I hope you dream about angels.
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "Memory of the Saints"
      Seo eahteoðe leahter is superbia gehaten þæt is on ænglisc modigynss gecweden. Seo is ord and ende ælcere synne. Seo geworhte englas to atelicum deoflum...
      The eighth sin is called Superbia that is called Pride, in English, which is the beginning and end of every sin; it made angels into horrible devils,...

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish انكل (engel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

engel (definite accusative engeli, plural engeller)

  1. obstacle

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]