errant

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman erraunt, from Old French errant, from Latin errans (wandering).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

errant (comparative more errant, superlative most errant)

  1. Straying from the proper course or standard, or outside established limits.
    • Sir Thomas Browne
      seven planets or errant stars in the lower orbs of heaven
  2. Prone to making errors.
  3. (proscribed) Utter, complete (negative); arrant.
    • Ben Jonson
      would make me an errant fool

Usage notes[edit]

Sometimes arrant (utter, complete) is considered simply an alternative spelling and pronunciation of errant, though many authorities distinguish them, reserving errant to mean “wandering” and using it after the noun it modifies, notably is “knight errant”, while using arrant to mean “utter”, in a negative sense, and before the noun it modifies, notably in “arrant knaves”.

Etymologically, arrant arose as a variant of errant, but the meanings have long since diverged. Both terms are archaic, primarily used in set phrases (which may be considered cliché), and are easily confused, and on that basis some authorities suggest against using either.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (utter, complete): arrant (generally distinguished; see usage)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French errant, from Latin errāns, errāntem.

Verb[edit]

errant

  1. Present participle of errer.

Adjective[edit]

errant m (feminine errante, masculine plural errants, feminine plural errantes)

  1. wandering
  2. errant (clarification of this French definition is being sought)

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

errant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of errō

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin errāns, errāntem.

Adjective[edit]

errant

  1. wandering; nomadic
    • The Anglo-Norman ‘Alexander’ (‘Le Roman de Toute Chevalerie’) by Thomas of Kent, ed. B. Foster, with the assistance of I. Short, ANTS 29-31 (1976), and 32-33 (1977). Available via anglo-norman.net.
      si est un pople qe n’est mie erranz; Ja n’istra de son regne
      If it's a people that is not nomadic, it will never leave his kingdom

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]