ethos

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἦθος (êthos, character; custom, habit). Cognate to Sanskrit स्वधा (svádhā, habit, custom).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ethos (plural ethe or ethea or ethoses)

  1. The character or fundamental values of a person, people, culture, or movement.
  2. (rhetoric) A form of rhetoric in which the writer or speaker invokes their authority, competence or expertise in an attempt to persuade others that their view is correct.
  3. (aesthetics) The traits in a work of art which express the ideal or typic character, as influenced by the ethos (character or fundamental values) of a people, rather than realistic or emotional situations or individual character in a narrow sense; opposed to pathos.

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Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἦθος (êthos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ēthos n (genitive ētheos); irregular declension

  1. Synonym of mōrēs
  2. (drama) character
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Marcus Terentius Varro to this entry?)
    • 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis historia 35.98:
      Is omnium prīmus animum pīnxit et sēnsūs hominis expressit, quae vocant Graecī ēthē, item perturbātiōnēs, dūrior paulō in colōribus.
      He [viz. Aristides of Thebes] was the first of all painters who depicted the mind and expressed the feelings of a human being, what the Greeks term ethe, and also the emotions; he was a little too hard in his colours.

Declension[edit]

Irregular (only some forms are attested, all of which follow the Greek)

Number Singular Plural
nominative ēthos ēthea
ēthē
genitive ētheos
dative ēthesi
ēthesin
accusative ēthos ēthea
ēthē
ablative ēthesi
ēthesin
vocative ēthos ēthea
ēthē

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Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ethos m (plural ethos)

  1. (aesthetics) ethos (the character or fundamental values of a person, people, culture or movement)

Related terms[edit]