exordium

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin exordium (beginning, commencement), from exōrdior (I begin, commence), from ex (out of, from) + ōrdior (I begin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

exordium (plural exordiums or exordia)

  1. (formal) A beginning.
  2. The introduction to an essay or discourse.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 17, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      Cicero thinks, in discourses of philosophy, the exordium to be the hardest part: if it be so, I wisely lay hold on the conclusion.
    • 1831, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Romance and Reality, volume 1, pages 180-181:
      The depreciation of her produce was next insisted upon; and I found this exordium led to the information that Messrs. Standish and Co. had been enabled, from the depressed state of the market, to lay in a large stock of Irish linen at unheard-of low prices.
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      This is a feeble article of faith to begin with, but it helps to push my pen through this exordium and what now follows.

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin exordium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌɛkˈsɔr.di.ʏm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: exor‧di‧um

Noun[edit]

exordium n (plural exordia or exordiums)

  1. introduction, preface (to an essay or plea)

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From exōrdior.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

exōrdium n (genitive exōrdiī or exōrdī); second declension

  1. beginning, commencement
  2. introduction, preface
  3. foundation, creation
    ab exordio urbis
    from the founding of the city

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative exōrdium exōrdia
Genitive exōrdiī
exōrdī1
exōrdiōrum
Dative exōrdiō exōrdiīs
Accusative exōrdium exōrdia
Ablative exōrdiō exōrdiīs
Vocative exōrdium exōrdia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • exordium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • exordium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • exordium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the conversation began in this way: sermo inductus a tali exordio