fib

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See also: FIB

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from fable; compare fibble-fable (nonsense).

Noun[edit]

fib (plural fibs)

  1. (informal) A lie, especially one that is more or less inconsequential.
    • Henry James
      They are very serious; they don't tell fibs.
  2. (informal, rare) A liar.
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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fib (third-person singular simple present fibs, present participle fibbing, simple past and past participle fibbed)

  1. (intransitive) To lie, especially more or less inconsequentially.
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Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from fibula

Noun[edit]

fib (plural fibs)

  1. (medicine, informal) Short form of fibula.
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

fib (third-person singular simple present fibs, present participle fibbing, simple past and past participle fibbed)

  1. (archaic, thieves' cant, boxing) To punch, especially a series of punches in rapid succession; to beat; to hit; to strike.
    • 1785, Grose, Francis, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue[1], 2nd edition, published 1788, To Fib:
      Fib the cove's quarron in the rumpad for the lour in his bung; beat the fellow in the highway for the money in his purse.
    • 1852, Thackeray, William Makepeace, “The Fight at Slaughter House”, in Men's Wives, page 16:
      As Biggs and his party arrived, I heard Hawkins say to Berry, "For heaven’s sake, my boy, fib with your right, and mind his left hand!"
    • 1865, Berkeley, Grantley, “Eton Boys”, in My Life and Recollections, volume 1, page 311:
      Then there was a wild scuffle and a furious outcry, and all the bargemen for a moment seemed to hug me and themselves too; when, as there was no room to hit out, in the phraseology of the ring, I fibbed at half-a-dozen waistcoats and faces with all my might and main.
    • 1883, Pyle, Howard, “Robin Hood Turns Beggar”, in The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood[2], page 207:
      Quoth he, "Thou dost surely jest when thou sayest that thou dost not understand such words. Answer me this: Hast thou ever fibbed a chouse quarrons in the Rome pad for the loure in his bung?"

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References[edit]

  • Farmer, John Stephen (1891) Slang and Its Analogues[3], volume 2, page 387

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Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

fib (plural fibs)

  1. weakness

Declension[edit]

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