fib

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See also: FIB

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɪb/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪb

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from fable; compare fibble-fable (nonsense).

Noun[edit]

fib (plural fibs)

  1. (informal) A lie, especially one that is more or less inconsequential.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:lie
  2. (informal, rare) A liar.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fib (third-person singular simple present fibs, present participle fibbing, simple past and past participle fibbed)

  1. (informal, intransitive) To lie, especially more or less inconsequentially.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

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References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from fibula.

Noun[edit]

fib (plural fibs)

  1. (medicine, informal) The fibula.
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

fib (third-person singular simple present fibs, present participle fibbing, simple past and past participle fibbed)

  1. (archaic, thieves' cant, boxing) To punch, especially a series of punches in rapid succession; to beat; to hit; to strike.
    • 1785, Grose, Francis, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue[2], 2nd edition, published 1788, To Fib:
      Fib the cove's quarron in the rumpad for the lour in his bung; beat the fellow in the highway for the money in his purse.
    • 1848, Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son
      The Chicken himself attributed this punishment to his having had the misfortune to get into Chancery early in the proceedings, when he was severely fibbed by the Larkey one, and heavily grassed.
    • 1852, Thackeray, William Makepeace, “The Fight at Slaughter House”, in Men's Wives, page 16:
      As Biggs and his party arrived, I heard Hawkins say to Berry, "For heaven’s sake, my boy, fib with your right, and mind his left hand!"
    • 1865, Berkeley, Grantley, “Eton Boys”, in My Life and Recollections, volume 1, page 311:
      Then there was a wild scuffle and a furious outcry, and all the bargemen for a moment seemed to hug me and themselves too; when, as there was no room to hit out, in the phraseology of the ring, I fibbed at half-a-dozen waistcoats and faces with all my might and main.
    • 1883, Pyle, Howard, “Robin Hood Turns Beggar”, in The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood[3], page 207:
      Quoth he, "Thou dost surely jest when thou sayest that thou dost not understand such words. Answer me this: Hast thou ever fibbed a chouse quarrons in the Rome pad for the loure in his bung?"
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Farmer, John Stephen (1891) Slang and Its Analogues[4], volume 2, page 387

Etymology 4[edit]

Short for Fibonacci.

Noun[edit]

fib (plural fibs)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. (neologism) A kind of experimental poem where the number of syllables in each line is the next succeeding Fibonacci number.

Anagrams[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

fib (nominative plural fibs)

  1. weakness

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]