fraise

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fraisen, from Old English frāsian (to ask, try, tempt), from Proto-Germanic *fraisōną (to attempt, try), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to attempt, try; risk, peril). Cognate with West Frisian freezje (to fear), Dutch vrezen (to fear, dread, be afraid), German freisen (to put at risk, endanger, terrify).

Verb[edit]

fraise (third-person singular simple present fraises, present participle fraising, simple past and past participle fraised)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To put in danger, in terror, or at risk.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French fraise (ruff), fraiser; compare French friser (curl), perhaps from Provençal frezar; ultimately from Germanic.

Noun[edit]

fraise (plural fraises)

  1. A type of palisade placed for defence around a berm; a defence consisting of pointed stakes driven into the ramparts in a horizontal or inclined position.
  2. (historical) A ruff worn (especially by women) in the 16th century.
  3. (historical) An embroidered scarf with its ends crossed over the chest and pinned, worn (especially by women) in the 19th century.
    • 1874, Peterson's Magazine - Volume 65, page 90:
      Among the most conspicuous is the pelerine collar, made of black velvet, and forming a fraise round the throat. The fraise is lined with such light-colored silks as pink and blue, and the pelerine is piped with silk of the same color.
  4. A fluted reamer for enlarging holes in stone; a small milling cutter.
  5. A tool for cutting the teeth of a timepiece's wheel to correct inaccuracies.

Verb[edit]

fraise (third-person singular simple present fraises, present participle fraising, simple past and past participle fraised)

  1. (military) To protect, as a line of troops, against an onset of cavalry, by opposing bayonets raised obliquely forward.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilhelm to this entry?)

Etymology 3[edit]

See froise.

Noun[edit]

fraise (plural fraises)

  1. A large thick pancake with slices of bacon in it.
    • 1827, Antoine B. Beauvilliers, The Art of French Cookery, page 103:
      Take a fraise and one udder or two (according to their size) of the veal, blanch and let them cool, mince them ; hash some mushrooms, shalots, parsley, and truffle;
    • 1855, Alexis Soyer, A Shilling Cookery for the People:
      It is related of Sarah, the Duchess of Marlborough, that no one could cook a fraise, as it was then called, for the great duke but herself.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)

Etymology 4[edit]

Borrowed from French fraise (strawberry), from earlier *fraige, from Latin frāga.

Phillip O'Shea Arms, with fraise (stylized strawberry with leaves) at center top

Noun[edit]

fraise (plural fraises)

  1. (heraldry) A stylized strawberry with leaves.
    • 1846, William Newton (Patent Agent), A Display of Heraldry, page 352:
      The surname of Bernard is derived from the ancestor carrying, for his device, Argent, a bear rampant sable muzzled or; the name of Frazer from the bearing of fraises or strawberry leaves; and many other instances might be adduced ...
    • 1893, Sir James Balfour Paul, An Ordinary of Arms Contained in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland, page 112:
      Az. a fraise arg. between three garbs or, all within a bordure engrailed of the second. George Cumming (1790)
    • 2015, Howard Belton, A History of the World in Five Menus:
      The Emperor also gave the family three fraises, or stalked strawberries, for their coat of arms.

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

fraise

  1. (Britain, dialect, dated) Commotion.
References[edit]
  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary (1908).

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

fraise

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Earlier *fraige, from Latin frāga, plural of frāgum.

Noun[edit]

fraise f (plural fraises)

  1. strawberry
  2. bulwark, palisade (defensive rampart of earth with sharpened wooden stakes set in at an angle)
  3. (literary) nipple
    • 1797, Marquis de Sade, Juliette, I:
      Les doigts de notre charmante supérieure chatouillaient les fraises de mon sein, et sa langue frétillait dans ma bouche.
    • 2001, Dominique Leroy, Hic et Hec, p. 53:
      un corset négligemment noué par une échelle de rubans gris de lin renfermait à demi la neige élastique de son sein, son mouchoir transparent, dérangé par les mouvements de la nuit, laissait voir une fraise vermeille [...].
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Arabic: فريز(frēz)
  • English: fraise
  • Khmer: ហ្វ្រែហ្ស៍ (frɛɛh)

Descendants[edit]

des fraises

Etymology 2[edit]

Related to fraiser, or possibly from a Vulgar Latin *fresāre, from Latin fresum, past participle of frendō, or from a derived root *fresa. Compare Italian and Spanish fresa.

Noun[edit]

fraise f (plural fraises)

  1. calf's mesentery
  2. (historical) fraise (ruff collar)
  3. milling cutter

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

fraise

  1. inflection of fraiser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]