fraise

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fraisen, from Old English frāsian (to ask, try, tempt), from Proto-Germanic *fraisōną (to attempt, try), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to attempt, try; risk, peril). Cognate with West Frisian freezje (to fear), Dutch vrezen (to fear, dread, be afraid), German freisen (to put at risk, endanger, terrify).

Verb[edit]

fraise (third-person singular simple present fraises, present participle fraising, simple past and past participle fraised)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To put in danger, terror, or at risk.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from French fraise (ruff), fraiser; compare French friser (curl), perhaps from Provençal frezar; ultimately from Germanic).

Noun[edit]

fraise (plural fraises)

  1. A type of palisade placed for defence around a berm; a defence consisting of pointed stakes driven into the ramparts in a horizontal or inclined position.
  2. (historical) A ruff worn (especially by women) in the 16th century.
  3. (historical) An embroidered scarf with its ends crossed over the chest and pinned, worn (especially by women) in the 19th century.
  4. A fluted reamer for enlarging holes in stone; a small milling cutter.
  5. A tool for cutting the teeth of a timepiece's wheel to correct inaccuracies.

Verb[edit]

fraise (third-person singular simple present fraises, present participle fraising, simple past and past participle fraised)

  1. (military) To protect, as a line of troops, against an onset of cavalry, by opposing bayonets raised obliquely forward.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilhelm to this entry?)

Etymology 3[edit]

See froise.

Noun[edit]

fraise (plural fraises)

  1. A large thick pancake with slices of bacon in it.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)

Etymology 4[edit]

Borrowing from French fraise (strawberry), from earlier *fraige, from Latin frāga.

Noun[edit]

fraise (plural fraises)

  1. (Gallicism, rare, especially in cooking) A strawberry.
    • 1978 January 27, New York Magazine, volume 11, number 9, page 62:
      The big-deal dessert is fraises Romanoff, ripe strawberries in liquored whipped cream.
    • 2015, Howard Belton, A History of the World in Five Menus,
      The Emperor also gave the family three fraises, or stalked strawberries, for their coat of arms.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

fraise

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Earlier *fraige, from Latin frāga, plural of frāgum.

Noun[edit]

fraise f (plural fraises)

  1. strawberry
  2. bulwark, palisade (defensive rampart of earth with sharpened wooden stakes set in at an angle)
  3. (literary) nipple
    • 1797, Marquis de Sade, Juliette, I:
      Les doigts de notre charmante supérieure chatouillaient les fraises de mon sein, et sa langue frétillait dans ma bouche.
    • 2001, Dominique Leroy, Hic et Hec, p. 53:
      un corset négligemment noué par une échelle de rubans gris de lin renfermait à demi la neige élastique de son sein, son mouchoir transparent, dérangé par les mouvements de la nuit, laissait voir une fraise vermeille [...].
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Related to fraiser, or possibly from a Vulgar Latin *fresāre, from Latin fresum, past participle of frendō, or from a derived root *fresa. Compare Italian and Spanish fresa.

Noun[edit]

fraise f (plural fraises)

  1. milling cutter

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From fraiser.

Noun[edit]

fraise f (plural fraises)

  1. calf's mesentery
  2. (historical) fraise (ruff collar)

Verb[edit]

fraise

  1. inflection of fraiser:
    1. first-person and third-person singular present indicative and present subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]