groat

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See also: Groat

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grot, from Old English grot, from Proto-West Germanic *grot, from Proto-Germanic *grutą. More at grit, grout.

Noun[edit]

groat (countable and uncountable, plural groats)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) Hulled grain, chiefly hulled oats.
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Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly from Middle Dutch groot, the Old French gros Tournois (a coin of Tours), from Medieval Latin denarius (coin) grossus (large). Related to German Groschen.

Noun[edit]

groat (plural groats)

  1. (archaic or historical) Any of various old coins of England and Scotland.
  2. A historical English silver coin worth four English pennies, still minted as one of the set of Maundy coins.
  3. A proverbial small sum; a whit or jot.
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References[edit]

  1. ^ Jespersen, Otto (1909) A Modern English Grammar on Historical Principles (Sammlung germanischer Elementar- und Handbücher; 9)‎[1], volume I: Sounds and Spellings, London: George Allen & Unwin, published 1961, § 10.81, page 315.

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