grot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: grót, gröt, and grøt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From grotto, by shortening, or French grotte.

Noun[edit]

grot (plural grots)

  1. (poetic) A grotto.
    • 1819, John Keats, La Belle Dame sans Merci:
      She took me to her elfin grot, / And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore, / And there I shut her wild wild eyes / With kisses four.

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from grotty.

Noun[edit]

grot (countable and uncountable, plural grots) (Britain)

  1. (slang, uncountable) Any unpleasant substance or material.
  2. (slang, countable) A miserable person.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed directly from Italian grotta or indirectly via French grotte, from Latin crypta, from Ancient Greek κρυπτός (kruptós). Doublet of crypte. Doublet of krocht. Doublet of gruft.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɣrɔt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: grot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun[edit]

grot f (plural grotten, diminutive grotje n)

  1. cave, cavern

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grot

  1. neuter nominative of gro
  2. neuter accusative of gro

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch groot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot (plural grotes or grottes)

  1. A groat or other silver coin of similar value, traditionally worth four pennies, or the weight corresponding to that coin.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

Adjective[edit]

grōt

  1. great

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

External sources[edit]

  • grōt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot n

  1. particle
  2. fragment

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grautaz, whence Old English great.

Adjective[edit]

grōt (comparative grōtoro, superlative grōtost)

  1. great

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot m inan

  1. arrowhead

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot m inan

  1. mainsail

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot f pl

  1. genitive singular of grota