grot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: grót, gröt, and grøt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Etymology 1[edit]

From grotto, by shortening, or French grotte.

Noun[edit]

grot (plural grots)

  1. (poetic) A grotto.
    • 1819, John Keats, La Belle Dame sans Merci:
      She took me to her elfin grot, / And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore, / And there I shut her wild wild eyes / With kisses four.

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from grotty.

Noun[edit]

grot (countable and uncountable, plural grots) (Britain)

  1. (slang, uncountable) Any unpleasant substance or material.
  2. (slang, countable) A miserable person.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch grot, either directly from Italian grotta or indirectly via French grotte, from Latin crypta, from Ancient Greek κρυπτός (kruptós).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot (plural grotte, diminutive grotjie)

  1. cave, cavern
    Kuiergaste mag die grot net met 'n gids binnegaan.
    Tourists may enter the cave only with a guide.
    Synonym: spelonk

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed directly from Italian grotta or indirectly via French grotte, from Latin crypta, from Ancient Greek κρυπτός (kruptós). Doublet of crypte, krocht, and gruft.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot f (plural grotten, diminutive grotje n)

  1. cave, cavern
    Twaalf mensen waren omgekomen, nadat ze in een grot verdwaald geraakt waren.
    Twelve people had passed away, after they had got lost inside a cave.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: grot

Anagrams[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grot

  1. neuter nominative of gro
  2. neuter accusative of gro

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch groot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot (plural grotes or grottes)

  1. A groat or other silver coin of similar value, traditionally worth four pennies, or the weight corresponding to that coin.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

Adjective[edit]

grōt

  1. big, large
  2. great

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • grōt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot n

  1. particle
  2. fragment

Declension[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *grautaz, whence Old English great.

Adjective[edit]

grōt (comparative grōtoro, superlative grōtost)

  1. great

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot m inan

  1. arrowhead

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot m inan

  1. mainsail

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

grot f pl

  1. genitive singular of grota

Further reading[edit]

  • grot in Polish dictionaries at PWN