lavender

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Lavender.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lavendre, from Anglo-Norman lavendre (French: lavande), from Medieval Latin lavendula, possibly from Latin lividus (bluish), but influenced by lavare (wash) due to use of lavender in washing clothes.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lavender (countable and uncountable, plural lavenders)

  1. Any of a group of European plants, genus, Lavandula, of the mint family.
  2. a pale purple colour, like that of the lavender flower.
    lavender colour:  
    web lavender colour:  

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


See also[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lavender (comparative more lavender, superlative most lavender)

  1. Having a pale purple colour.
  2. (politics) Pertaining to lesbian feminism; opposing heterosexism.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lavender (third-person singular simple present lavenders, present participle lavendering, simple past and past participle lavendered)

  1. (transitive) To decorate or perfume with lavender.
    • 1986, Katherine Gibson Fougera, With Custer's Cavalry, page 47:
      Short shafts of dying sunlight mingled with the deepening grey, lavendering the horizon, and all nature seemed to hush as though waiting to welcome the night.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French lavandiere, from Medieval Latin lavandārius.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lavənˈdeːr/, /ˈlavəndər/, /lau̯nˈdeːr/, /ˈlau̯ndər/

Noun[edit]

lavender (plural lavenderes)

  1. A washer; one (especially a woman) who washes clothes.
  2. (euphemistic) A woman employed in prostitution or having loose morals.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: launder
  • Scots: launer
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French lavendre.

Noun[edit]

lavender

  1. Alternative form of lavendre