leac

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lecc, from Proto-Celtic *ɸlikkā, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥keh₂ ‎(flat surface).

Celtic cognates include Welsh llech, Breton lec'h, Cornish legh, and the Gaulish toponym Are-lica. Indo-European cognates include Ancient Greek πλάξ ‎(pláx, flat stone). Ultimately connected with PIE *pleh₂- ‎(flat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

leac f ‎(genitive singular leice, nominative plural leaca)

  1. large, flat stone; slab (paving stone); flagstone
  2. gravestone
    leac lena cheann.
    He is dead and buried.
  3. slab (flat piece of material), something slab-shaped
    leac seacláide‎ ― a slab of chocolate
    Ghearr an long an coipeadh ina leaca.
    The ship cut the foam into slabs.
  4. kitty (pool of money)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*flikkā”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 134
  • lecc” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “leac” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • "leac" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laukaz. Cognate with Old Saxon lōk (Low German Look), Dutch look, Old High German louh (German Lauch), Old Norse laukr (Danish løg, Swedish lök, Icelandic laukur).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lēac n

  1. leek

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *lěkъ, from Proto-Germanic *lēkijaz.

Noun[edit]

leac n ‎(plural leacuri)

  1. medicine, remedy, cure

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lecc, from Proto-Celtic *ɸlikkā, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥keh₂ ‎(flat surface).[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh llech, Breton lec'h, Cornish lehan ‎(slate, slab), and the Gaulish toponym Are-lica. Indo-European cognates include Ancient Greek πλάξ ‎(pláx, flat stone). Ultimately connected with PIE *pleh₂- ‎(flat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

leac f ‎(genitive lice, dative lic, plural leacan)

  1. slab (of stone)
  2. ledge (of rock)
  3. flagstone, paving stone
  4. slate (for writing on)
  5. gravestone
  6. cheek

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 134
  • lecc” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.