legato

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See also: légato

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian legato, past participle of legare (to tie up, tie together, to bind), learned borrowing from Latin ligō (tie, bind). Doublet of ligate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

legato (not comparable)

  1. (music) Smoothly, in a connected manner.
    Play this passage legato, not portato.
    Antonyms: portato, staccato

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

legato (countable and uncountable, plural legatos)

  1. (music) A style of performance characterized by smoothly connected notes.
    • 1936, Edward E. Cramer, The Basis of Artistry in Violin Playing, page 49:
      It is the coördination of the finger and hand as examplified in the proportionate speed of shifting according to the speed of the musical passage, which makes for evenness, continuity, smoothness, and ultimately, a fine legato.
    • 1979, Leslie Sheppard, ‎Herbert R. Axelrod ·, Paganini, page 604:
      At the end of the prelude of Caprice V, there is a chromatic ascending and descending scale of forty-eight notes to be played in one bow in legato.
    • 1989, Siglind Bruhn, Guidelines to Piano Interpretation, page 97:
      Clementi, in his "Introduction to the art of playing the piano-forte" (1801) still had to advise pianists that : "the best general rule is to keep the keys of the instrument suppressed during the whole length of the note" (p.8) and "whenver the composer leaves the legato or staccato to the taste of the performer, the best rule is to use the legato in most cases and to reserve the staccato in order to give particular passages more spirit and to enhance the higher beauties of the legato."
  2. (music) A passage that is played legato.
    • 1893, The Organ: Monthly Journal Devoted to the King of Instruments, page 198:
      It schools the mind to watch for the legato all the time, as its absence at the organ is mor prominent than at the piano; but beyond this point it renders little assitance to the pianist.
    • 1958, József Gát, The Technique of Piano Playing, page 95:
      A good pianist, however, will make his audience believe that he is as capable of performing a legato as is a singer or violinist.
    • 2000, Chroma Report, page 15:
      Legatos are indicated in both notations by a bow between respective notes.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

legato (accusative singular legaton, plural legatoj, accusative plural legatojn)

  1. singular present nominal passive participle of legi

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin legatus.

Noun[edit]

legato (accusative singular legaton, plural legatoj, accusative plural legatojn)

  1. (Catholicism) legate

Etymology 3[edit]

From Italian legato.

Noun[edit]

legato (uncountable, accusative legaton)

  1. (music) legato

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian legato.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

legato m (plural legatos)

  1. (music) legato

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From legare.

Adjective[edit]

legato (feminine legata, masculine plural legati, feminine plural legate, superlative legatissimo)

  1. awkward, stiff
  2. linked, connected, tied
  3. close, attached, involved

Verb[edit]

legato (feminine legata, masculine plural legati, feminine plural legate)

  1. past participle of legare
Further reading[edit]
  • legato1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin lēgātus.

Noun[edit]

legato m (plural legati)

  1. legate
  2. legacy, bequest, background
Derived terms[edit]
Further reading[edit]
  • legato2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lēgātō

  1. dative/ablative singular of lēgātus

Participle[edit]

lēgātō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of lēgātus