lofe

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See also: lofé

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lofe, lof (praise, price), from Old English lof (praise, glory, repute, song of praise, hymn), from Proto-Germanic *lubą (praise, permission), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (to love, like). Cognate with Scots lofe (an offer), North Frisian lof (praise), Dutch lof (praise, glory, commendation), German Lob (praise, commendation, tribute), Icelandic lof (praise).

Noun[edit]

lofe (plural lofes)

  1. (West Midlands and Northern England) An offer; choice; an opportunity; chance.
    • 1869, Gibson, Alexander Craig, The Folk-Speech of Cumberland and Some Districts Adjacent[1], page 212:
      "Yance I hed t' lofe an' I'd luck to say no, an' I niver hed t' lofe ageàn."—Said by an elderly spinster.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English loven, from Old English lofian (to praise, exalt, appraise, value, set a price on), from Proto-Germanic *lubōną (to praise, vow), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (to love, like). Cognate with Scots lofe, love (to offer at a price), North Frisian lowe (to vow, swear), Dutch loven (to praise, bless, commend), German loben (to praise, laud, commend), Icelandic lofa (to promise, praise, allow). More at love (Etymology 3).

Verb[edit]

lofe (third-person singular simple present lofes, present participle lofing, simple past and past participle lofed)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To praise; commend.
  2. (transitive, West Midlands and Northern England) To offer; offer at a price; expose for sale.
    • 1899, Dickinson, William; Prevost, Edward William; Brown, Simon Dickson, A Glossary of the Words and Phrases Pertaining to the Dialect of Cumberland[2], page 202:
      Ah'd lofed him it an' he wadn't tak 't.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lofe

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lofer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of lofer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of lofer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of lofer
  5. second-person singular imperative of lofer

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lofe (plural lofes)

  1. Alternative spelling of lof
    • c. 1175, “Dominica in Quadragessima”, in Belfour, Algernon Ikey, editor, Twelfth Century Homilies in MS Bodley 343[4], published 1909, lines 12–14, page 48:
      Æt þam ytemestan, broðor mine, hér æfter fyliȝæð þeo mongung be þare ælmessæn lofe.
      In conclusion, my brethren, after this comes an exhortation in praise of charity.