lof

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See also: löf and lôf

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Mapudungun lof (community).

Noun[edit]

lof (plural lofs)

  1. Community, tribe: basic social organization of the Mapuche, Huilliche, and Picunche peoples, a (familial) clan which recognizes the authority of a lonco.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch lof, from Old Dutch lof, from Proto-Germanic *lubą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (love).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lof m (uncountable)

  1. praise
    Antonyms: blaam

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From loof

Noun[edit]

lof n (uncountable)

  1. Clipping of witlof (chicory).

Mapudungun[edit]

Noun[edit]

lof

  1. community

Synonyms[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch lof, from Proto-Germanic *lubą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (love).

Noun[edit]

lof m, n

  1. praise
  2. prestige

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • lof”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • lof (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English lof (praise, glory, song of praise, hymn).

Noun[edit]

lof

  1. praise, glory
    • a. 1225, “In Dominica Palmarum”, in Morris, Richard, editor, Old English Homilies and Homiletic Treatises[1], published 1868, page 7:
      Drihten, þu dest þe lof of milc drinkende childre muðe.
      Lord, out of milk-drinking children's mouths thou bringest forth praise.
    • 1422, Yonge, James, “The Gouvernaunce of Prynces, or Pryvete of Pryveteis”, in Steele, Robert; Henderson, T, editors, Three Prose Versions of the Secreta Secretorum[2], translation of Secretum Secretorum by anon., published 1898, lines 15–18, page 136:
      For evyll workys may noght be y-hyde anente the Pepill: for the wyche thynge lese he moste his lof, his roialme shall fall, the crovne of his honnoure and of his reuerence he moste faille.
  2. price, value
  3. reputation, honour

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

lof m (plural lofs)

  1. (Jersey, nautical) luff

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lubą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (love). Cognate with Old Saxon lof, Dutch lof, Old High German lob (German Lob), Old Norse lof (Swedish lov). Related to lēof, lufu, lofian.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lof n

  1. praise, glory
  2. song of praise, hymn
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lōfô. Cognate with Icelandic lófi, Gothic 𐌻𐍉𐍆𐌰 (lōfa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lōf m (nominative plural lōfas)

  1. (anatomy) the palm of the hand
    • (Can we date this quote?) (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Hæfde sigora weard on þam wangstede wǣre betolden lēofne lēodfruman mid lōfe sīnum []
Inflection[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lof c, n

  1. Obsolete spelling of lov (permission)