monotone

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the post-Classical Latin monotonus (unvarying in tone) or its etymon the Ancient Greek μονότονος (monótonos, steady”, “unwavering); compare cognate adjectives, namely the French monotone, the German monoton, the Italian monotono, and the Spanish monótono, as well as the slightly earlier English noun monotony and adjective monotonical.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɒ.nə.təʊn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmɑː.nə.toʊn/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

monotone (comparative more monotone, superlative most monotone)

  1. (of speech or a sound) Having a single unvaried pitch.
    • 1940, Asiatic Society (Calcutta, Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, India), Journal of the Asiatic Society, page 95:
      The prominence of the syllables is more monotone than in English, the intonation of the latter having a larger variation of stressed and unstressed syllables.
    • 1998, Roger W. Shuy, Bureaucratic Language in Government and Business, Georgetown University Press, Research on Telephone vs. In-Person Administrative Hearings, page 76:
      In the formal register, such variation is reduced and the talk has a more monotone, business-like quality.
  2. (mathematics) Being, or having the salient properties of, a monotone function.
    The function is monotone on , while is not.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

monotone (plural monotones)

  1. A single unvaried tone of speech or a sound.
    When Tima felt like her parents were treating her like a servant, she would speak in monotone and act as though she were a robot.
    • 1799, John Walker, Elements of Elocution, Cooper and Wilson, page 309:
      It is no very difficult matter to be loud in a high tone of voice; but to be loud and forcible in a low tone, requires great practice and management; this, however, may be facilitated by pronouncing forcibly at firſt in a low monotone; a monotone, though in a low key, and without force, is much more ſonorous and audible than when the voice ſlides up and down at almoſt every word, as it muſt do to be various.
    • 1846 October, Alfred B[illings] Street, “A Day’s Hunting about the Mongaup”, in George R[ex] Graham, editor, Graham’s American Monthly Magazine of Literature and Art, volume XXIX, number 4, Philadelphia, Pa.: George R. Graham & Co., [], OCLC 1017756595, page 190:
      There is a water-break formed by a small terrace of rock in mid-stream, and purling with a hollow, delicious monotone—an island of pebbles is above, with here and there smaller ones near the "forks."

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

monotone (third-person singular simple present monotones, present participle monotoning, simple past and past participle monotoned)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak in a monotone.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

monotona +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

monotone

  1. monotonously
  2. in monotone

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

monotone (plural monotones)

  1. monotone
  2. whose speech is monotone
  3. boring due to uniformity or lack of variety; monotonous

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

monotone

  1. inflected form of monoton

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

monotone

  1. feminine plural of monotono

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

monotone

  1. singular definite of monoton
  2. plural of monoton

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

monotone

  1. singular definite of monoton
  2. plural of monoton