obliger

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

oblige +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /əˈblaɪdʒə(ɹ)/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

obliger (plural obligers)

  1. One who, or that which, obliges.
    • a. 1639, Henry Wotton, a letter to Edmund Bacon
      it is the natural property of the same heart, to be a gentle Interpreter, which is so noble an Obliger

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French obliger, from Old French obligier, borrowed from Latin obligāre, present active infinitive of obligō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

obliger

  1. (transitive) to oblige, to require, to compel, to force someone (to do something: (transitive with à))
    Synonyms: contraindre, forcer
  2. (Louisiana) to help, to aid
  3. (passive) (transitive with de) to have to
    Synonym: devoir

Conjugation[edit]

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written oblige- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

obliger

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of obligō

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French obligier, from Latin obligāre, present active infinitive of obligō.

Verb[edit]

obliger

  1. (transitive) to oblige

Conjugation[edit]

  • As parler except an extra e is inserted after the final g before a and o.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

  • French: obliger