obliger

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

oblige +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

obliger (plural obligers)

  1. One who, or that which, obliges.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir H. Wotton to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for obliger in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French obliger, a borrowing from Latin obligāre, present active infinitive of obligō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

obliger

  1. (transitive) to oblige, to require

Conjugation[edit]

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written oblige- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

obliger

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of obligō

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin obligāre, present active infinitive of obligō.

Verb[edit]

obliger

  1. (transitive) to oblige

Conjugation[edit]

  • As parler except an extra e is inserted after the final g before a and o.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]