pollution

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See also: Pollution

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English pollucion, from Anglo-Norman pollutiun, Middle French pollution, pollucion, and their source, post-classical Latin pollūtiō (defilement, desecration; nocturnal emission) (4th century), from the participial stem of polluō (to soil, defile, contaminate), from por- (before) + -luō (to smear), related to lutum (mud) and luēs (filth). Compare Ancient Greek λῦμα (lûma, filth, dirt, disgrace) and λῦμαξ (lûmax, rubbish, refuse), Old Irish loth (mud, dirt), Lithuanian lutynas (pool, puddle).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pəˈl(j)uːʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pəˈluʃən/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

pollution (countable and uncountable, plural pollutions)

  1. Physical contamination, now especially the contamination of the environment by harmful substances, or by disruptive levels of noise, light etc. [from 18th c.]
    Pollution levels are almost always higher in cities rather than the countryside, what with the cars, industry and so on.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 1, in Internal Combustion[1]:
      If successful, Edison and Ford—in 1914—would move society away from the [] hazards of gasoline cars: air and water pollution, noise and noxiousness, constant coughing and the undeniable rise in cancers caused by smoke exhaust particulates.
    • 2018 July 13, Matthew Taylor, The Guardian[2]:
      Schools across the country are moving to ban the school run amid growing concern about the devastating impact of air pollution on young people’s health.
    • 2019, George Monbiot, “Cars are killing us. Within 10 years, we must phase them out”, in Guardian.:
      Pollution now kills three times as many people worldwide as Aids, tuberculosis and malaria combined.
    • 2023 August 9, “Network News: Network rail under fire for spending thousands of pounds on flights”, in RAIL, number 989, page 15:
      "Flying only looks like a bargain because the cost of pollution is so cheap."
  2. Something that pollutes; a pollutant. [from 17th c.]
  3. (now rare) The desecration of something holy or sacred; defilement, profanation. [from 14th c.]
  4. (now archaic) The ejaculation of semen outside of sexual intercourse, especially a nocturnal emission. [from 14th c.]
    • 1839, Robley Dunglison, Medical Lexicon, Blanchard, page 492:
      When occasioned by a voluntary act it is called, simply, Pollution or Masturbation (q.v.); when excited, during sleep, by lascivious dreams, it takes the name Noctur'nal pollution, Exoneiro'sis, Oneirog'mos, Oneirog'onos, Gonorrhœ'a dormien'tium, G. oneirog'onos, G. Vera, G. libidino'sa, Proflu'vium Sem'inis, Spermatorrhœ'a, Paronir'ia salax, Night pollution.
    • 1927, Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex[3], volume 1:
      According to Billuart and other theologians, pollution in sleep is not sin, unless voluntarily caused; if, however, it begins in sleep, and is completed in the half-waking state, with a sense of pleasure, it is a venial sin.
  5. Moral or spiritual corruption; impurity, degradation, defilement. [from 15th c.]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pollūtiōnem. By surface analysis, polluer +‎ -tion.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pollution f (plural pollutions)

  1. pollution
    Synonyms: profanation, souillure
    pollution nocturnewet dream (literally, “nocturnal pollution”)

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