quant

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See also: Quant and quant'

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kwɒnt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒnt

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening.

Noun[edit]

quant (plural quants)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. (finance) A quantitative analyst.
    • 2014 January 30, Simon Roberts Was Here (The Crazy Ones), episode 15:
      Judy Mills: Oh, and I was very excited to hear about your agency's new emphasis on hard numbers and data.
      Simon: Excuse me?
      Judy Mills: Yeah, I heard you hired a quant.
  2. Short for quantity.
  3. Short for quantifier.

Adjective[edit]

quant (not comparable)

  1. Short for quantifiable.
  2. Short for quantitative.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Of uncertain origin. A borrowing from Latin contus (long pole) has been suggested, but the -a- is problematic.

Noun[edit]

quant (plural quants)

  1. A punting pole with a broad flange near the end to prevent it from sinking into the mud; a setting pole.
  2. A vertical shaft used to drive a millstone.

Verb[edit]

quant (third-person singular simple present quants, present participle quanting, simple past and past participle quanted)

  1. (transitive or intransitive) To propel using a quant.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan quant, from Latin quantus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quant (feminine quanta, masculine plural quants, feminine plural quantes)

  1. (interrogative) how many; how much
  2. (with the definite article) quite a bit; quite a few (considerably)
    • 2019 August 12, Josep Maria Ganyet, “L’ordinador i la calma”, in La Vanguardia[1]:
      Per entendre de què estem parlant hem de fer una passa enrere... d’uns quants milions d’anys.
      To understand what we're talking about, we have to take a step back... of quite a few million years.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quantum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

quant

  1. Only used in quant à

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin quantus.

Adjective[edit]

quant m (feminine singular quante, masculine plural quants, feminine plural quantes)

  1. how many; how much
    • 15th century, Rustichello da Pisa (original author), Mazarine Master (scribe), The Travels of Marco Polo, page 6, line 8:
      Quant ils orent chevauchier ne sçay quantes iournees
      When they had ridden for I don't know how many days
      (please note, the first word 'quant' corresponds to etymology 2 below)

References[edit]

  • quant on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French quant, from Latin quando, see quand.

Adverb[edit]

quant

  1. Alternative form of quand

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan can, from Latin quantus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quant m (feminine singular quanta, masculine plural quants, feminine plural quantas)

  1. (interrogative) how many; how much

Adverb[edit]

quant

  1. (interrogative) how many; how much

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quandō.

Conjunction[edit]

quant

  1. when

Adverb[edit]

quant

  1. (interrogative) when

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle French: quand, quant