scutum

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Scutum

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin scūtum (shield). Doublet of escudo, scudo, scute, écu.

Noun[edit]

scutum (plural scuta)

  1. (historical, Roman antiquity) An oblong shield made of boards or wickerwork covered with leather, with sometimes an iron rim; carried chiefly by the heavy-armed infantry of the Roman army.
  2. (zoology) A scute.
  3. (zoology) In many contexts a shield-like protection, such as the scutum protecting the back of a hard tick
  4. (zoology) One of the two lower valves of the operculum of a barnacle.
  5. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (obsolete) A penthouse or awning.

Latin[edit]

tria scūta (three scuta)

Etymology[edit]

Referred to either Proto-Indo-European *skewH- (to cover, protect) or Proto-Indo-European *skey- (to cut, split). See obscūrus, Old Irish scíath, Russian щит (ščit).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈskuː.tum/, [ˈskuː.tũ]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

scūtum n (genitive scūtī); second declension

  1. a shield, especially the scutum, the large oblong wooden shield carried by the Roman infantry
  2. (by metonymy) shield-bearing soldiers
  3. (figuratively) a defense, protection, shelter

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative scūtum scūta
Genitive scūtī scūtōrum
Dative scūtō scūtīs
Accusative scūtum scūta
Ablative scūtō scūtīs
Vocative scūtum scūta

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • scutum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • scutum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • scutum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • scutum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • scutum in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin