scutum

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See also: Scutum

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin scūtum ‎(shield).

Noun[edit]

scutum ‎(plural scuta)

  1. (historical, Roman antiquity) An oblong shield made of boards or wickerwork covered with leather, with sometimes an iron rim; carried chiefly by the heavy-armed infantry of the Roman army.
  2. (zoology) A scute.
  3. (zoology) In many contexts a shield-like protection, such as the scutum protecting the back of a hard tick
  4. (zoology) One of the two lower valves of the operculum of a barnacle.
  5. (obsolete) A penthouse or awning.
    • Alexander M. Burrill
      SCUTUM. L.Lat. In old English law. A pent-house or awning; literally, a shield, or shelter. By the Assise of Measures, 9 Ric.I. it was forbidden to all merchants throughout England, to spread over their shop windows red or black cloths or awnings (scuta,) or any other things by which the sight of purchasers is often deceived in selecting a good cloth. [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alexander M. Burrill, Law Dictionary and Glossary, 2nd ed. vol 2 1871

Latin[edit]

tria scūta (three scuta)

Etymology[edit]

From a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *skei- ‎(to cut, split), which is an extension of Proto-Indo-European *sek- ‎(to cut). Compare Old Irish scíath, Russian щит ‎(ščit). Related to Ancient Greek σκῦτος ‎(skûtos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

scūtum n ‎(genitive scūtī); second declension

  1. a shield, especially the large oblong wooden shield carried by the Roman infantry
  2. (by metonymy) shield-bearing soldiers
  3. (figuratively) a defense, protection, shelter

Inflection[edit]

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative scūtum scūta
genitive scūtī scūtōrum
dative scūtō scūtīs
accusative scūtum scūta
ablative scūtō scūtīs
vocative scūtum scūta

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]