traditor

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin traditor (betrayer), from trado (I hand over). See traitor.

Noun[edit]

traditor (plural traditors or traditores)

  1. A deliverer; a name of infamy given to Christians who delivered the Scriptures, or the goods of the church, to their persecutors to save their lives.
    • 1794, Joseph Milner, The History of the Church of Christ
      A number of bishops cooperated with him , piqued that they had not been called to the ordination of Cæcilian . Seventy bishops , a number of whom had been traditors , met thus together at Carthage , to depose Cæcilian.

References[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

traditor m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of traditore

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From trādō (give up, hand over); literally "one who hands over (something)".

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trāditor m (genitive trāditōris, feminine trāditrīx); third declension

  1. betrayer, traitor
  2. teacher

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative trāditor trāditōrēs
Genitive trāditōris trāditōrum
Dative trāditōrī trāditōribus
Accusative trāditōrem trāditōrēs
Ablative trāditōre trāditōribus
Vocative trāditor trāditōrēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • traditor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • traditor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • traditor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • traditor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Piedmontese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

traditor m (plural traditor)

  1. traitor