magister

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See also: Magister and magíster

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin magister (a master, chief, head, superior, director, teacher, etc.), from magis (more or great) + -ter. Doublet of master and maestro.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmædʒɪstə(ɹ)/

Noun[edit]

magister (plural magisters)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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  1. Master; sir: a title used in the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.
  2. The possessor of a master's degree.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch magister, from Latin magister.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [maˈɡɪstər]
  • Hyphenation: ma‧gis‧têr

Noun[edit]

magistêr (plural, first-person possessive magisterku, second-person possessive magistermu, third-person possessive magisternya)

  1. (higher education) master's degree.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From magis (more or great) + Proto-Indo-European *-teros. Compare minister.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /maˈɡis.ter/, [maˈɡɪs.t̪ɛr]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /maˈd͡ʒis.ter/, [maˈd͡ʒis.t̪ɛr]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

magister m (genitive magistrī); second declension

  1. teacher
  2. master; a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative magister magistrī
Genitive magistrī magistrōrum
Dative magistrō magistrīs
Accusative magistrum magistrōs
Ablative magistrō magistrīs
Vocative magister magistrī

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *maester:


Borrowings

From Vulgar Latin *maester:


From magister:



References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin magister.

Noun[edit]

magister m (definite singular magisteren, indefinite plural magistere or magistre or magistrer, definite plural magisterne or magistrene)

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, a historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin magister.

Noun[edit]

magister m (definite singular magisteren, indefinite plural magistrar, definite plural magistrane)

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, a historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin magister

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

magister m (genitive magistir, nominative plural magistir)

  1. master, teacher
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d10
      Do·adbadar sund trá causa pro qua scripta est æpistola .i. irbága ro·bátar leosom eter desciplu et debe; óentu immurgu eter a magistru.
      Here, then is shown the reason for which the epistle was written, i.e. they had had contentions and disagreements between the disciples; unity, however, among their masters.

Declension[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative magister magisterL magistirL
Vocative magistir magisterL magistruH
Accusative magisterN magisterL magistruH
Genitive magistirL magister magisterN
Dative magisterL magistraib magistraib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
magister
also mmagister after a proclitic
magister
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
magister
also mmagister after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Directly from Latin magister.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

magister m pers (abbreviation mgr)

  1. magister (The possessor of a master's degree)
  2. master's degree (a postgraduate degree)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

magister f (abbreviation mgr)

  1. feminine equivalent of magister (The possessor of a master's degree)

Declension[edit]

Indeclinable.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin magister.

Noun[edit]

magister m (plural magisters)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) male teacher

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) scolast
  • (Sutsilvan) surmester

Coordinate terms[edit]